Collateral damage — learning to live without regret: Part VI

See also: Part I  Part II  Part III  Part IV  Part V Part VI: Accepting reality By Daisy . . . Looking back on our impossible journey, I see now that it was the accrual of tiny little steps—just minute little decisions—that sent us on a trajectory that involved future full-time employment, completed education, home ownership, savings for retirement, and friendships. It’s not everything that…

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The registry continues to crack and crumble: a due process victory

By Morgan G. Stalter . . . Alaska’s Supreme Court on Friday ruled that the state’s sex offender registry violated the due process rights of those convicted of sex crimes in other states, deeming it “too broad and arbitrary when it includes offenders who are not dangerous.” The court ruled 3-2 in favor of a man, referred to as John…

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Collateral damage — learning to live without regret: Part V

See also: Part I  Part II  Part III  Part IV Part V: A new way of life By Daisy . . . As offenders and collaterally damaged family members know, living with a sex offense conviction is suffocating and paralyzing. It’s like being in a strong current that pulls you deep into a huge, scary ocean where someone else controls the narrative that defines…

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“They need to be marked for life”

By Sandy . . . The mandatory chemical castration law that has just passed in Alabama is being debated every way possible. Health professionals are weighing in on why, medically, it is not an effective prevention strategy. From a moral and human rights perspective, the general consensus is that it is barbaric and reminiscent of our nation’s earlier and darker forays…

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Current sexual offense policies: “Less about managing risk than maximizing punishment”

Image and article used with permission from Prison Policy Initiative By Wendy Sawyer . . . By now, most people who pay any attention to criminal justice reform know better than to label people convicted of drug offenses “drug offenders,” a dehumanizing label that presumes that these individuals will be criminals for life. But we continue to label people “sex…

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NARSOL honors Rozek, Prizio, Nessel, and Illinois legal team at annual awards banquet

By Robin and Sandy . . . One of the highlights among so many at NARSOL’s annual conference is the banquet and awards ceremony. NARSOL initiated the awards in 2015 with two awards. The Braveheart Award recognizes a person outside of NARSOL who does something, normally in the course of his or her work, that is consistent with our mission…

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NARSOL conference 2019 is now a memory

By Sandy . . . As I write this, I have been home less than ten minutes after the conclusion of our Houston conference, our eleventh. It has been a most incredible experience. We have been honored to extend ten scholarship grants to persons who otherwise would not have been able to attend, persons who qualified under the requirements set…

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Collateral damage — learning to live without regret: Part IV

See also: Part I  Part II  Part III Part IV: Barely surviving By Daisy . . . Two years later, I had gained a little confidence after finally leaving my retail job for an administrative assistant position, and I had the brilliant idea of picking up where my life left off in 2003. I decided to finally get on with my original…

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The importance of Gundy v. U.S.

By Peter J. Wallison . . . Gundy v. United States is not listed in most media accounts of important matters now before the Supreme Court, yet this case could profoundly change how courts intervene to preserve the constitutional separation of powers in the future. Involving just one individual petitioner, Herman Avery Gundy, and only one issue — how to interpret…

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“I wish I was executed because my life is basically over”

By Mona Charen . . . With several septuagenarians competing for the presidency, the ghost of the 1990s looms over the 2020 race. Joe Biden has faced criticism for his sponsorship of the 1994 crime bill. President Donald Trump tweeted, “Anyone associated with the 1994 Crime Bill will not have a chance of being elected.” Here’s some context. Violent crime…

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