Sexual offender residency restrictions: unscientific, wasteful, useless

By Sandy . . . The Missouri legislature is in the process of considering HB2142, a bill that would prohibit anyone on the sexual offense registry from entering or being within 500 feet of any of the nature or education centers controlled by the Missouri Department of Conservation. The stated purpose is for the protection of children who are frequent visitors,…

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More residency restrictions bite the dust

By Andrew Bowen . . . The city of San Diego has settled a lawsuit challenging a city law that limits where convicted sex offenders can live, agreeing to enforce the law only against those who are on parole. The 2008 ordinance bans all registered sex offenders from living within 2,000 feet of a school, park or other facility that…

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What a difference a day (on the sex offender registry) makes

By Sandy . . . Several decades ago, a boy by the name of Adam Oakey was the bane of the Albuquerque, New Mexico, police department with an extensive juvenile record. As an adult arrested six times on various charges of assault and battery between 1997 and 2007, he was described as the stuff of which nightmares are made. Hearing him…

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Georgia media reacts to NARSOL’s press release re Cobb County sheriff

As of today, two Georgia media outlets have done stories about NARSOL’s cease-and-desist letter to Georgia sheriff Neil Warren and our related press release. One of them also taped a video interview with our E.D. Brenda Jones. We hope to post that video here soon. In the meantime, here are the stories. Group confronts Cobb County sheriff over ‘invented requirements’…

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NARSOL to sheriff: “Stop what you’re doing or face legal action.”

Sheriff Neil Warren of Cobb County, Georgia, and his deputies are enforcing several requirements against those on the sexual offense registry in their county that are not authorized in their state’s SORNA specifications. These include unauthorized frequency of home visits, threats of jail if certain actions aren’t performed, harassing behaviors, and unauthorized requirement of information. On January 27, 2020, NARSOL…

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NARSOL speaks out against town sex offender ordinances

By Benjamin Pierce . . . Officials in two Rock County [WI] towns want more control over where sex offenders live, but a national organization said such restrictions hinder offender rehabilitation. The town of Johnstown and the town of Harmony have drafted ordinances regarding sex offenders. “Those people have to stay someplace, but it would just be nice if we…

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Those Georgia sheriffs just won’t stop

By Sandy . . . When the sheriffs of Butts County and Spalding County last Halloween announced they would erect signs at the homes of those on their sexual offense registries warning trick-or-treaters away from the homes, NARSOL sent letters advising them that they were overstepping their legal authority and to abandon this practice. This was not the first year…

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Which makes us safer? Residency restrictions or enhanced rehabilitation for former sexual offenders?

Originally published in Criminal Legal News By Sandy . . . Twenty years ago, at age 23, William committed a serious sexual crime for which he spent three years in prison and participated in an intensive treatment program – four hours a day, five days a week. He confronted the demons of his own childhood molestation and emerged, literally, a…

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Tennessee registrant’s business success doesn’t please everyone

By Sandy . . . Sometimes situations arise that leave me almost too speechless to write about them. This is one such case. Four years ago, in 2016, Brandon Hester was a middle school teacher in Clarksville, Tennessee. He was charged, convicted, and incarcerated for sexual contact with one of his young male students. He is now on probation and…

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THIS is why we so often can’t trust the media

By Sandy . . . Starting with the headline, “NC sex offender convicted of being at middle school shelter after Hurricane Florence,” almost every point made in the piece raises more questions. Hurricane Florence hit parts of North Carolina September 13, 2018, and severe storm conditions and flooding lasted for days, even weeks. According to the article, Jerry Faircloth, a…

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