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Residency restrictions cut back in Wisconsin city

By Patrick Leary . . . Because of recent legal challenges to similar ordinances, Racine is making adjustments to how restrictive it is about where sex offenders can reside. According to City Attorney Scott Letteney, just 3.7 percent of the city’s housing stock is available to sex offenders under the city’s current ordinance. Under the new ordinance, which was approved…

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“Choose between homelessness and reoffending”

By NBC 12 On Your Side…. Thousands of your tax dollars are being spent to help sex-offenders keep a roof over their heads. On Tuesday, a man called 12 On Your Side, saying he’s upset he’s being kicked out of the program just as he’s working to rebuild his life. For purpose of this story, we called him Mike. “I’m trying…

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Are sex offender registries reinforcing inequality?

Trevor Hoppe, University at Albany, State University of New York Public sex offender registries are at the forefront of what I’ve described in my research as a “war on sex.” Offenders convicted of sex crimes are now singled out for surveillance and restrictions far more punitive than those who commit other types of crime. More than 800,000 Americans are now…

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Former sex offender makes positive difference in others’ lives

By Sandy…. In the wake of the release of long-time incarcerated convicted sexual offender and former priest Paul Shanley, journalists are rushing to find a different angle to present the situation. Elaine Thompson found an excellent one.  The focus is on another convicted offender, former attorney Joel Pentlarge who, since he has been released, has done everything he could to…

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Megan’s Law waste of time, money, report shows

By CBS News This study and this article were done in 2009 but are as true, timely, and essential today as then. A study examining sex offenses in the state where Megan’s Law was created says it hasn’t deterred repeat offenses. The report released Thursday finds that registering sex offenders in New Jersey does make it easier to find offenders…

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Ohio poised to remove thousands from registry

By Katie Wedell . . . Two decades after Ohio began labeling sex offenders on a public database and setting restrictions on where they can live, a major overhaul to the law is being proposed that could drop thousands of lower-level offenders off the list. Some critics are even calling for doing away with the registry entirely, saying it’s been an…

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Packingham: Unanimous Court strikes NC’s social media ban

By Robin . . . In a broadly worded opinion penned by Justice Kennedy, a unanimous Supreme Court has closed the door on laws restricting access to the internet and social media forums by Americans who were convicted of a crime but who are no longer serving a criminal sentence. In reversing the N.C. Supreme Court’s decision in Packingham v.…

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Reckless threat of registration brings death to son, family

By Sandy….   “They scared him to death.” When Maureen Walgren of Naperville, Illinois, said this, referring to the conversation that school officials and law enforcement had with her 16-year-old honor student son Corey, she meant it literally. Corey was at lunch on a normal school day in his high school this past January when he was called into the…

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Sex offender registries — instruments of oppression

By Michael Rosenberg . . . I see little in life that looks like a sex offender registry with its incumbent restrictions. School was tough when I didn’t have friends, and life can look a little bleak when I look around now at my limited social experiences. Yet while I have to skip many events that take place within shouting distance…

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Supreme Court unconvinced by North Carolina’s Facebook argument

By Sandy . . . “There are three principal features of North Carolina’s law that make it a stark abridgment of the Freedom of Speech.” These words, spoken by attorney David Goldberg, opened the oral arguments of the petitioner Lester Packingham to the Supreme Court today, Monday, February 27. At 21, Mr. Packingham was convicted of taking indecent liberties with…

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