Don’t be scared! Get ready for Halloween

By Sandy . . . NARSOL will once again this year host a Halloween Marathon. This will be the third extended program of this nature that NARSOL has done, and we hope that everyone will participate. The intent of the marathon session is to monitor law enforcement’s Halloween activities and carefully evaluate where we will litigate next. Last year we…

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Consider yourself served!

By Sandy . . . From Aurora, Illinois comes good news: Thanks to litigation filed, the city is backing off its threat to force nineteen registrants to leave Wayside Cross Ministries. Furthermore, a federal judge has ordered the men be registered as living at Wayside. Even though the city insists that the actual threat of the registrants having to leave…

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Suit filed in Missouri: “Registry results in retribution for past offenses”

By Pat Pratt . . . A woman barred by her church from a marathon to fight hunger and a man who saw hatred spewed so often his daughter was forced to move and his wife took her own life — they and others are seeking removal from Missouri’s life-long sex offender registry, arguing it is unconstitutionally cruel. The children…

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Conference 2018 – Recent Landmark Decisions – Attorneys Jeff Gamso and Lea Bickerton

The basis for litigation reform and the results of civil rights litigation vary widely from state to state and jurisdiction to jurisdiction. This presentation examines a number of challenges from the past couple of years and seeks to understand the key constitutional arguments that have been made, what has been successful, and the reason why there are such disparate results…

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Victory in New Jersey: part of Megan’s Law ruled unconstitutional

By S.P. Sullivan . . . New Jersey’s highest court has ruled a portion of Megan’s Law unconstitutional because it requires juveniles to remain listed on the state’s sex offender registry for life. The unanimous Supreme Court decision found placing such a lifetime requirement on child offenders violated their due process rights under the state constitution. “Indeed, categorical lifetime notification…

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NARSOL files amicus brief in Ninth Circuit case

By NARSOL Communications . . . Innocent until proven guilty is one of our most cherished constitutional protections. Laws in Arizona have demolished that protection for those accused of certain sexual crimes. A man with such a conviction, Stephen Edward May, brought a case against the state, and the conviction was overturned by a federal district court in Arizona. The…

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NARSOL supports man who won rare constitutional challenge

By Larry Neely . . . The National Association for Rational Sexual Offense Laws (NARSOL) has filed an amicus curiae brief in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in support of Stephen Edward May, whose conviction for child molestation in an Arizona case has been set aside by the federal court in Arizona. NARSOL’s interest in…

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As dumb as it gets: mixing forced homelessness and GPS monitoring

By Riley Vetterkind . . . Michael walked out of the Oshkosh Correctional Institution in April 2017 at age 60 with $140 to his name, a record as a sex offender and a GPS monitoring bracelet strapped to his ankle. Michael, who requested that only his middle name be used to avoid public attention, was convicted of two child sex crimes,…

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NARSOL affiliate files lawsuit in Connecticut

By Anthony Branciforte . . . WINDSOR LOCKS — An anonymous resident and an advocacy group that represents accused and convicted sex offenders have filed a federal lawsuit seeking to strike down the town’s 10-year-old policy barring people on Connecticut’s sex offender registry from a number of public places. The organization, Connecticut for One Standard of Justice, says the town’s…

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