Supreme Court: Definition of “crime of violence” unconstitutionally vague

By Larry . . . NARSOL has some good news today from the United States Supreme Court in the case of Sessions v. Dimaya. The case involved James Dimaya, a lawful, permanent resident of the United States whose deportation was sought because of two convictions for first-degree burglary in the state of California. After his second offense, the government sought…

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Federal judge in Indiana holds mandatory “sex offender” classes unconstitutional

By Fatima Hussein . . . A federal judge has ruled that Indiana’s mandated sex offender classes for prisoners who oppose them violates the constitutional right to be free from self-incrimination. The Sept. 28 ruling in the class-action lawsuit filed in the Southern District of Indiana will affect all convicted, incarcerated sex offenders who opt out of the Indiana Sex Offender Monitoring and Management, or SOMM, program. Three of the…

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Why you should never, ever talk to police

By Robin . . . As a student, I was highly impressed by the manner in which Professor Duane could take a subject as dull and unattractive as civil procedure (civ pro) and, by his sheer energy and command of oratory, turn it into the 1L class nobody would ever forget. It didn’t hurt that he so often began his…

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Sixth Amendment off-limits to people accused of sexual offense

By Sandy….. When something I write references something read elsewhere, especially when I use direct quotes, I always link to the other piece. Due to my refusal to give the other piece or its publisher any credence or recognition, this post will be the exception to that rule. In a major election year, one expects nasty, attack campaign ads. The…

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