Criminal or civil? Right or wrong? Does anyone care?

By Scott H. Greenfield . . . It’s bad enough, both for substantive as well as factual reasons, that the Supreme Court in Smith v. Doe held that sex offender registration was not punitive, but civil, and therefore beyond the reach of the Ex Post Facto Clause. Not only was it grounded in utterly baseless statistics of recidivism, but it indulged in the fantasy that…

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NARSOL files amicus brief to Supreme Court, joins another

By Robin . . . The National Association for Rational Sexual Offense Laws (NARSOL), along with its North Carolina affiliate NCRSOL, has filed an amicus brief to the United States Supreme Court in an ex post facto case that originated in a North Carolina Superior court in September, 2014. The case is styled In Re: Anthony Rayshon Bethea and was last…

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Cato Inst. files amicus brief to Supreme Court in ex post facto case

Used with permission By Ilya Shapiro and Nathan Harvey . . . Article I, Section 10 of the Constitution provides that “[n]o State shall … pass any … Ex Post Facto law.” The Ex Post Facto Clause was incorporated into the Constitution to prohibit states from enacting retrospective legislation, which the Framers believed to be inherently unfair and contrary to the principles of…

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Sex offender registry sparks Supreme Court debate

By Lydia Wheeler… Supreme Court justices on Tuesday grappled with how much power Congress can pass on to federal agencies in a case that could change the way Capitol Hill legislates. The justices on the eight-member court heard arguments over whether Congress crossed a line in 2006 when it passed the federal Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act that was…

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Conference 2018 – Recent Landmark Decisions – Attorneys Jeff Gamso and Lea Bickerton

The basis for litigation reform and the results of civil rights litigation vary widely from state to state and jurisdiction to jurisdiction. This presentation examines a number of challenges from the past couple of years and seeks to understand the key constitutional arguments that have been made, what has been successful, and the reason why there are such disparate results…

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NARSOLs Brenda Jones on Law and Disorder Radio

https://lawanddisorder.org/wp-content/uploads/lawanddisorder20180723.mp3 Tayler Boncal was a 22-year-old student teacher and track coach at Conrad High School in West Hartford. She was arrested this past February and charged with three counts of second-degree sexual assault for having a consensual relationship with an 18-year-old male student. The young man initiated the relationship and was not a member of the track team. If convicted of…

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7th Circuit ruling will force registered sex offenders from homes

By Larry . . . NARSOL is disappointed to report that the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit issued a decision affirming a lower court’s decision that will permit the Chicago Police to retroactively evict registered citizens from their homes to comply with the state’s residency restrictions. In Vasquez v. Foxx, 17-1061 (7th Cir. 2018) two registered…

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NARSOL streamlines original lawsuit; NCRSOL files new lawsuit

By Robin Vander Wall . . . On April 16, 2018, NARSOL’s attorney, Paul Dubbeling, represented NARSOL, NCRSOL, and two Doe plaintiffs before federal District Court Judge Loretta Biggs at a hearing to defend NARSOL v. Stein against the state of North Carolina’s Motion to Dismiss. Then on May 30, Judge Biggs entered an order seeking “a more definite statement”…

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Sex offender registries: A legacy of fear

By Steve Yoder . . . Quentin (not his real name) was convicted eight years ago of child pornography possession in Florida. He served his time and has since moved to another state. But his sentence required his photo and other personal details to appear on Florida’s sex offender registry, and there they will stay for the rest of his life,…

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