Registered Americans fear assault, robbery, even murder

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    • #7962 Reply
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      admin

      By Matt Clarke . . . As repeatedly reported in Prison Legal News, for over a decade registered sex offenders have been targeted by vigilantes and assa
      [See the full post at: Registered Americans fear assault, robbery, even murder]

    • #7963 Reply
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      T

      This why notifications are doing more harm than good, and they have to be stopped.

    • #7964 Reply
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      Accessories to the crime

      This is why I believe the state and federal governments should be held complicit as an accessory to these crimes since it is their laws enabling this behavior. I don’t know if this is possible, but it is a direct, as the evidence points to here, relation to the registry being public.

    • #7965 Reply
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      Jim

      As sex offender laws currently stand, they invite and encourage violence against rso’s. It is unthinkable that those writing, passing, and enforcing these laws consider the violence against registered citizens an acceptable consequence. All of us must hope for relief from the courts. The majority of politicians could care less. Having blood on their hands is better than the risk of losing votes. These are, in many ways, very sad days for our nation.

    • #7966 Reply
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      Two wrongs don’t make it right

      Two wrongs, e.g. a public registry and a vigilante using it for their purposes, don’t make it right, e.g. accosting a registered person. This is what the courts and politicians have failed to see or don’t care about when they do see it.

      Would love to see the court justices be told by an atty during oral arguments or in a brief that the court registry decisions have killed registered people, people with families too, and what their reactions would be. Would the justices understand that and change things or just say it was a consequence of the registered person’s actions, much like the registry is a consequence and not a punishment; therefore, oh well? If the latter, would that be like the court giving a license to kill, hurt, or maim with a lassie faire attitude despite the fine print saying you cannot use the registry for negative things like vigilantism?

      Maybe an editorial is a better way to address that so the atty does not antagonize the court during the hearing. Of course, if it is in the court record…

      Actions, reactions, consequences….

    • #7967 Reply
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      Mary Davye Devoy

      Hyping an issue from either side is not a smart strategy. But it is the cheap and easy route

      Fear-mongering got us into this mess, it’s stupid to use it to try and get us out of it.

      Onslaught? I don’t think so.

    • #7968 Reply
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      admin

      Thank you for the comment, Mary. I have softened the heading somewhat so as to address this concern. The piece by Matt Clarke is republished from this month’s edition of Prison Legal News which ran it under the heading: “Vigilantes Assault, Rob and Murder Registered Sex Offenders.”

    • #7969 Reply
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      Mary Davye Devoy

      I appreciate the title correction and the reply Robin.
      I did read Matt Clarke’s piece.
      As advocates of Registry reform we all need to be cognizant of how we argue for reform and integrity should be #1 priority.
      Thanks and good luck with everything ya’ll are working on!
      Mary

    • #7970 Reply
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      Jim

      Certainly fear-mongering is not a means to obtain favorable actions, nor is fear itself a healthy state of mind for those who must endure the inevitable consequences of being on a sex offender registry. While the percentage of sex offenders actually encountering violence may be small, the potential for such is an ever present reality. To publish commentary on the threat against registered citizens and their families isn’t exactly fear mongering, as both offenders and the public ought to be made aware that these conditions exist. Nevertheless, it is the voice of reason, patience, and perseverance that will gain an ear in the courts of law. Surely there is no need to ignore the incidents of “vigilante justice” being perpetrated upon some offenders. It is a reality of life that deserves to be heard. However, it will not likely be the argument that wins the day in bringing about change in registry laws. Thank God for those so willing and ably qualified to determine the most effective ways to overcome (if possible) the deeply oppressive registry laws. Registered citizens need not fear, nor resort to fear-mongering. We simply must refuse to succumb, and continue to use the voice of reason to bring about meaningful change. It is a monumental hurdle, but it is a cause that can be won in time, or so one hopes.

    • #7971 Reply
      Fred
      Fred
      Admin

      I wouldn’t say highlighting this situation is fear mongering, but rather more evidence of the harmful effects of the registry laws. Imagine if these victims had their children with them at the time of the assaults by the vigilantes. That would contradict what the lawmakers claim the registry is for. The possibility of this happening while children are present seems likely enough to me.

      I wonder how many cases of harrassement or assault have not been reported. Maybe we should start a program to encourage registrants to come forward and share these incidents with us so we can get a better estimate on how often they happen.

    • #7972 Reply
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      T

      Vigilantes that engage in crimes against registrants for the things they’ve done and claim that what they are doing is justifiable and reasonable are no less evil, and dangerous people. Vigilantes are criminals who are engaging in violent criminal acts while registrants that have already paid their debts to society and lived their lives normal and stays out of trouble.

    • #7973 Reply
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      Defeats the purpose now, huh?

      Good point Fred. Kinda defeats the purpose for the “safety of children” now doesn’t it if the child(ren) are present during vigilante justice using registry info?

      If only a someone(s) would come forward with examples that can be used where children are impacted by this vigilante justice, that could grab some attention. Heck, it could even be non-violent, but verbal or other gesture(s) by someone acting out in a vigilante manner where a child(ren) are present.

    • #7974 Reply
      Fred
      Fred
      Admin

      Maybe NARSOL can send out an email blast asking members to come forward if any such incidents have happened.

    • #7975 Reply
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      NH Registrant

      In my state, in 2014, someone was going around targeting people on the registry. The first found a man who was a paraplegic who had done time for a pornography possession charge. They shot him dead as soon as he answered the door. He died in his front hallway while sitting in his wheelchair. Not more than 10 miles away, a man was brutally beaten in the doorway of his home because he was mistaken for a registrant who lived nearby. The police, unsurprisingly, never found the perpetrator(s). They didn’t even do a full investigation. This is what we deal with. Janice Belucci has gone over the dangers of being on the useless registry and how it IS punishment – contrary to what our federal supreme court justices say.

      We on the registry live with targets on our own backs, the backs of our family members, and possibly those who live in our immediate area. The registry must be either made private and reporting requirements/fees lessened or eliminated. You should only have to report if you move. And you should NEVER have to pay a fee to be on the registry like it is some kind of privilege! You’re paying a fee so that you can endanger the people you love and those around you. Funny how politicians never make it on the registry who commit like offenses. It’s disgusting what our country has become. I am so glad we have people like NARSOL who fight for us. No one other than our family and friends will fight for us.

    • #7976 Reply
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      Peter

      Whenever I walk out of my house or go to town I’m always looking over my shoulder. After I had to register in 2003 I was scared to death to leave the house.But now 13 and a 1/2 years later there is still some fear but not as much. I think if someone were to write down all the incidences of vigilante justice against registered citizens whether the victims are alive or dead and compile them in a book maybe someone would see what these laws are really doing.

    • #7977 Reply
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      Jim

      Because of the passions that have been inflamed by the mass dissemination of false statistics, violence against sex offenders is merely collateral damage, under the guise of protecting the public. Just as people accept certain levels of contamination in their food, or levels of lead in their water, so they accept a degree of violence against registered citizens. The rule of law in our nation is slowly succumbing to the rage of passions, and registry laws are an example of this. I do not mean to disparage any of the lower courts, for there are some very fine judges in this land, who treasure the rights of ALL Americans. However, it is my personal opinion that the SCOTUS is the last bastion of Constitutional integrity in America. We simply must hope it remains so. It seems unlikely that help will come legislatively (be it state or federal), because politics is governed by what is popular and financially expedient.

    • #7978 Reply
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      NH Registrant

      The SCOTUS ruled that “Registration is NOT punishment”. So, hopefully you’ll forgive me if I don’t trust them to actually advocate real justice. They are just as bought off by corporations and the “military industrial complex” (which owns law enforcement and the prison system) as the rest of the government.

    • #7979 Reply
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      Guydownthestreet

      I have been Shot in the leg, attacked by by a guy with a knife. Had my break lines cut 9 times. I have had thinks thrown at my home. Countless windshields replaced. Obscene letters left on my doorstep. Verbally assaulted and threatened. Every single one of these incidents have been reported to police. NOTHING ever comes of it.
      When I was shot it took 12 hours for the police to respond. My crime? Consensual sex with a girl that was 17 years 11 months and 2 weeks old. I was 35 at the time.

      I did no jail time, Sentenced to 90 days of electronic monitoring. 10 years of probation and Life time registration. ( Arizona ) I moved to Louisiana With my wife and my reg time was reduced to what this states laws deem proper.

      After 9 years and 6 months of these things happening to me we decided it was best for my wife to move. She was also the target of a few incidents.

      I accept all of this. My interactions with that girl was wrong. I just want to know how much is enough?

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