Brain-based fact or interrogator’s fiction?

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    • #8037 Reply
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      admin

      By Michael Rosenberg . . . I want to first say that I am tired of watching the registered citizens in my sex offender class pay for the privilege of b
      [See the full post at: Brain-based fact or interrogator’s fiction?]

    • #8038 Reply
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      Thomas Allen Darby

      I have been “polygraphed” before, most recently in 2007 when I was accused of exposing myself on a river beach that I’d never heard of, and could not have walked on due to disability in any case. My stupid ass actually VOLUNTEERED to take a lie detector test. The examiners said I lied! Much later in court, a police officer testifying said the results were “inconclusive.” I wound up convicted… and because of a prior sex offense, I spent 7 years of a 9-year sentence in prison. Lie detectors produce statistics… and the cops lie routinely to get a conviction. As the saying goes, there are three kinds of lies… lies, damn lies, and statistics.

    • #8039 Reply
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      Jim

      The seriousness of these issues is being missed by the American people in general, because it is all wrapped in the package of “sex offenders.” By appealing to the negative passions of people (as in, “these terrible sex offenders) it does not register that we are moving into such a condition in this country that anyone who does not fall into line with the government will meet with severe consequences. Prisons, on both a state and federal level, are “revenue,” and that is a disaster for the general population. It may be pointed at sex offenders presently, but that is only smoke screen for what lies ahead. We can only hope that people will wake up, but a country that is mesmerized by materialism and drunk with the lust for entertainment pays little attention to what is actually going on around them. It is both disturbing and heartbreaking.

    • #8040 Reply
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      Laura

      IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
      FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF GEORGIA
      NEWNAN DIVISION

      UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,
      v.
      LAURA CHAPMAN,
      Defendant.

      NO. 3: 1O-CR-001-R WS

      ORDER

      An issue has arisen regarding a requirement that Defendant submit to a specific incident polygraph as part of her treatment at Highland Institute. Defendant has objected to the polygraph out of concern that she may be asked about incidents outside the conduct about which she has pled guilty. She wishes to protect her right not to incriminate herself. However, the Highland Institute has indicated that she may not continue her treatment, which is a condition of her supervision, if she does not submit to the polygraph. The Court finds that it would be improper to order Defendant to incriminate herself as a part of her treatment. The undersigned recognizes that this may compromise the treatment plan for Defendant. However, the constitutional rights of the Defendant take priority in this circumstance. Therefore, Defendant is not required to answer questions in a polygraph examination concerning incidents about which she has not pied guilty. If this ruling disqualifies her from treatment at the Highland Institute, then an alternative treatment program will need to be found or the case will need to be brought back before the Court for further consideration.

      SO ORDERED this day of November, 2016.
      ‘Richard Story
      UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE

    • #8041 Reply
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      Maestro

      We all know what cops do (more importantly the “detectives”), so please, someone explain why they deserve respect from any of us?

      Furthermore, these polygraphs are only part of a probation release. Once you’ve completed probation, it doesn’t matter if you’re still required to register, you are no longer subjected to polygraphs.
      I keep saying it and I won’t stop saying it until someone who can get the ball rolling actually attempts to get it rolling – PROBATION IS COMPLETELY UNNECESSARY. Do away with the probation departments. Period.
      If we all opted to take more time in prison, we could have all left prison with NO probation. So what’s the point of it? Besides being a job for legalized bullies?
      Think about it.

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