Reply To: Absurd laws turn sexting teens into child pornographers

#9153
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Prosecutor with a big ego

So, let’s bring the comments back to the topic at hand here…..children, sexting and overzealous prosecutors

From the sidebar, there is this interesting case: “Editorial: Girl’s ‘sexting’ doesn’t warrant criminal prosecution” (http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/opinion/editorials/2016/10/02/editorial-girls-sexting-doesnt-warrant-criminal-prosecution/91314936/)

Which stems from this article: Bsau: Can you prosecute a victim for her exploitation?” (http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/opinion/columnists/rekha-basu/2016/09/30/basu-can-you-prosecute-victim-her-exploitation/91326554/)

And both of those are offshoots of this original article: Lawsuit aims to block ‘sexting’ charges against teen (http://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/news/crime-and-courts/2016/09/28/iowa-prosecutor-sued-response-sexting-case/91213768/)

So, can the girl who photographed herself in racy, but not obscene by legal definition, poses be prosecuted? On what grounds since nothing meets the legal definition of obscene? What if she merely kept these non-obscene photos on her phone? Can she be charged with the manufacturing of and possession of, possible intent to distribute, but not actually distributing child porn?

I think this prosecutor is trying to make a name for himself and teach moral lessons when it is not his place to do so, but the parents place in the end. Those who did share nude photos were dealt with as they should have been. Case closed. Yet he is being challenged and has taken exception to it.

People know when to say No and they are taught that. People also know how phone apps and sharing apps work today since this generation is raised on this technology. To think and say otherwise is foolish. Next thing you know swimsuit photos will be verboten and burkas issued in Iowa to teach lessons.