Sexual crime conviction in 1999 cancels out 29 years of service to country

By Captain Charles Munsey . . . Today, October 5, I started out as I routinely do — cup of coffee, morning devotions, a quick breakfast, and then on the road to take care of chores.  First, I stopped by my daughter’s home in Rockledge to drop off something for her and converse with her and my grandson for a while.  Then I set off for Patrick SFB (Space Force Base) to take care of chores there — pick up prescription meds, get a haircut, and then pick up groceries at the commissary.  Very routine, the same as I have been doing for years, since March, 2003 when I first moved to Florida and was placed on the Florida registry.

Today was different, as I was to find out.  At the gate my ID card was questioned, so I went over to the visitor’s center to find out what the problem was. It is the same ID card that I have used for years.  At the ID card office, I was informed that because I am on the Florida Sex Offender Registry, I no longer have access to the base — after all these years, years during which I was on the registry and welcomed on base.  My meds were waiting to be picked up, blood pressure and cholesterol.  My primary care provider is Dr. Botardo who is assigned to the Patrick Med Facility.  Basically, all of my retired military benefits have now been removed because of my being on the Florida registry.

My offense was in Virginia 24 years ago, eight years after my retirement from the U.S. Navy. I paid my debt to society in Virginia and sold my home in Virginia Beach to move to Florida because of my father’s bad health and my mother needing assistance.  Without ever committing an offense in Florida, I was added to the Florida  registry.  I was transferred to Florida on an interstate compact which allowed me to serve the period of probation in Florida. I was removed from probation 11 years early.  I live in a peaceful neighborhood and get along well with my neighbors.  I am no longer on the Virginia registry, where my failure took place after my wife’s death.

So now, as of today, with no reason whatsoever, my retirement benefits on base, my ability to even go on base, have been removed with absolutely no facts to explain or justify the removal other than false fear and paranoia.  My 29 years of service mean absolutely nothing.  The victim, my daughter, forgave me and we were reconciled years ago; she and her family now live in Rockledge, FL.

I have been living a perfectly normal life until today when the commander of the space force base fell victim to false information about registered citizens.  As those in the ‘know’ know, in Florida, once on the registry, always on the registry. Not even sainthood, departure from Florida, or death is justification for removal from Florida’s registry or even consideration of it. The registry is a ‘money maker’ for Florida and neither justice/forgiveness/restoration is reason for removal.  I belong to an organization that is trying to educate those in leadership positions, but in some cases, stupid/greed/lack of knowledge is hard to fix.

I pray that someday, soon hopefully, I will have my retirement benefits restored and that I can go on living a normal life.  A copy of this has been mailed to Brig. Gen. Stephen Purdy, commander of the 45th Space Wing at Patrick.

God save America,
Charles Munsey Jr.
Capt USN Ret

P.S. In the meantime, my prescription drugs wait to be picked up.  As my neighbor’s wife told me — he is a retired NYPD officer — I’d be better off if I had murdered someone.

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37 Thoughts to “Sexual crime conviction in 1999 cancels out 29 years of service to country”

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  1. David Brown

    I am so sad for you. I live in Oregon. I was removed from the registry around 2016. I feel stuck in Oregon since going to another state means going on their registries. The felony was also reduced to a misdemeanor meaning I can own firearms. My heart goes out to you.

  2. Jerry P

    First of all Captain, I want to thank you for your service. I, too, have served in the United States Navy, and have been a registered citizen. It seems as if all the good things I have ever done in my life before being convicted (pled guilty), served and now a disabled veteran, 17+ years in nursing, doesn’t account for anything. I have been off the registry for over 5 years. Still can’t find work, etc. My crime was in NC. I moved to Tennessee shortly after I got out of prison. I am “forever” on the registry in Tennessee even though I moved back to NC and worked hard to get myself off the registry here where my crime happened. The system is broken, and now it’s voting season again we can rest assured we will see more candidates running on keeping our communities “safer” from sex offenders if we vote them in… I feel I am ranting, so I’ll close for now. Again Captain, I appreciate your steadfast service to our country.

    1. Nicky Bryant

      There is no reason that Tennessee would keep you on their registry if you move. I would contact, the TBI and an attorney. If you notify Tennessee that you are moving, you are removed from there registry and placed on the other state’s registry.

  3. Reggie

    Sadly, the captain is tragically correct. If he had just murdered his daughter, he’d be living the life of Reilly. We need to advocate for more homicides. No justice, no peace!

  4. Emma

    I’ve always Known how terribly this SO registry has caused so much Harm to people than it is to Protect. This horrible law needs to Change. Everyone needs a Second Chance in Life. The SO Registry needs to be Abolished.

    1. Ollie Octopus

      Amen!!!

    2. Barb Young

      I agree with you
      You severed your time for crime you deserve a second chance. After that stiffer rules

    3. Jorge

      Amen to that ! All of us who are registered and family members and true friends must unite. Together we can be a voice for reasonable justice and a voice for a second chance in life. Drug dealers get a chance then why no us. Reasonable politicians need to be picked out and voted into office, not fear mongering double talk politicians. United we can make this happen.

  5. Edward

    Capt. Munsey,
    I am also a veteran, and wait for the same thing to happen. I believe it would be breach of contract with my honorable retirement from the USAF. I was charged and convicted while in the USAF. And I was allowed to continue my Air Force career, even while, on unsupervised probation. And YES the Air Force put me through a BOARD to determine if they were going to release me from the military due to the conviction. They overwhelmingly came back with a vote that allowed me to remain on active duty.
    So I feel if they change the game now, its lawsuit time. I was told I would get those benefits for the rest of my life, unless, I was incarcerated which as it stands now! I never spent one day or night in jail.
    I was even promoted and allowed to do Temp Duty outside the USA.

    Thanks 4 allowing me to say this.
    Ed S.

  6. Frank Story

    It’s amazing how in the 21st century delusional ideologies are still the norm throughout societies, particularly America. Yours is but one of countless testimonials of similar atrocities. Further proof of the insidious nature of the registry. Imagine those unable to be heard. Sadly, it’s not just you this punishes, but your family as well.
    I am thankful for your service and bravery Capt. Munsey.

  7. David

    Your biggest mistake was moving to Florida were there is no rule of law or Constitutional Rights. I too am an Honorably Discharged Veteran. After being stricken of ALL of my Constitutional Rights as a registered person I have absolutely no desire to even set foot on a military instillation or raise arms in defense of this Communist Country!

    1. John

      The only SOLUTION i see is to file lawsuit upon lawsuit against these Civil Registry Schemes, and FLOOD the courts until the Legislatures recognize the punitive results the State and Agencies have added.

      1. Sandy

        With the emphasis on the fact that the registry is a CIVIL regulatory scheme. When punishment occurs due to it, it has crossed the line from civil to criminal and is punishing retroactively, the freedom from which is a constitutional right that is still available to everyone.

  8. Anne

    I don’t think state registries can bar anyone from federal retiree military benefits. I think you fall within TRICARE and if so, you should contact Veterans Benefits Administration.

  9. Victor Palma

    First, thank you for your service CAPT Munsey! I was saddened and angered that you went through this ordeal. I’m surprised it took this long quite frankly. I know the services have been under orders to implement something like this for many years. The last time I tried to access an Army post here in Maryland, I had trouble too. Eventually I was allowed on, but I have been loathe to try again since then. I am worried that not only will I be denied access, but also that they might confiscate my ID card, even though I am entitled to carry it. I too am retired military (30 years service retired Lt Col, USAF) and carry my retired ID card with great pride. I’ve had no trouble getting on to a National Guard base but as you well know, a small base like that does not provide anything compared to an active duty base like Patrick. I have also read that it is up to each base commander to make a decision like this so it’s a bit of a crapshoot whether or not we might have trouble accessing a particular base or not. I wish you the best of luck and hope to hear back that you had success by sending a copy of your letter to the base commander.

  10. Oswaldo

    I feel the same way you do, sir. I’m a retired senior chief, and had been going on base for 14 years when the base C.O. in Oklahoma did the same thing to me. I got off probation in 2018, 18 years after I retired. I use the VA instead. I found out about the banishment the same day I went to pick up prescriptions at the base clinic. While on active duty I saved the lives of 3 aviators (words from the aircraft pilot in command), earned 3 Navy Achievement Medals and two Navy Commendation Medals, served in Desert Storm, etc. I don’t want or need thanks for my service (but I do appreciate the words when I hear them), I just want the benefits back. Remember these words “for those who serve, freedom has a taste the protected will never know.”

  11. JJJJ

    Captain Munsey:
    I am so sorry to hear about your ill treatment! We have met at a few of the FAC meet and greets, so this was stunning to me. I can only imagine the hurt and anguish that you must have felt!
    Let me say this, sir:
    Your honors and merits preceed you, and this dishonor that has been done to you is deeply disturbing!
    To have served as a military captain and an aeronautical engineer are such high-placed and difficult-to-earn honors that you should be esteemed and given great deference despite having made some very human mistakes.
    This is outrageous, sir!
    I am so sorry that you have been shabbily treated!
    I wish there were something that I could do. Sadly, I can’t imagine how I could. But, please don’t hesitate to ask if there is anything. I can be reached through the Lee County Coordinator’s office.
    My thoughts and prayers are with you, sir.
    Very Truly,
    Jeff

  12. Jim

    What I’m glad to see is that Florida received a Great Big Hunk of Karma with the latest hurricane! All of the idiots that have put forth the registry, are all hypocrites. They say they do it for the children. Ohhh, to just save the children they claim with a smile. Hypocrites. They are putting hundreds of thousands of children at risk. Risk for bulling at school after their parent is forced to be on a list that other parents see online. Then the registrant’s child’s new friend is forced to be an enemy by the misinformed parent of the online search. Then the children of forced registrant parent, are at risk of suicide. What about the child of a forced registrant parent that gets thrown in jail for a mistake on their paperwork. What happens to that child then? What about being in the wrong place then having to move because their parent can’t live in that area. WHAT ABOUT THE CHILD THAT WILL NOT BE ALLOWED IN AN HURRICANE EVACTUATION SHELTER????? Simply because that child’s parent is a forced registrant, and that child drowns in the storm??? So, are the hypocrites really so worried about the children? I assure you they have other motives than to “protect the children”….. Its All About Money.

    1. Allie

      You are so right. The kids suffer so much for something they didn;t even know about until they started being bullied at school because some parent saw it on the registry. It needs to be abolished for sure. It’s not protecting our kids it’s destroying them.

  13. mut

    i thought the military was suppose to defend the constitution, not stand in defiance. what hapoened?

    1. Rick R

      Lawyers and politicians happened.

      1. Oswaldo

        We all know when you can tell a lawyer or politician is lying-their mouths are moving!

  14. Steve

    I also console w the Captain. If it is a local commander decision you may also want to address a letter to him/her. I am also retired military, but have not been stopped at the gate before, although I rarely go on a base anymore. I am waiting for retirees to have the monthly retirement checks stopped. That will be the final straw.

    1. TM

      Steve, I agree this seems to be a Base CC decision. It is His/Her base and they can bar anyone if they believe it is in the best interest of safety and security. Best thing to do is write the Base CC and see if you can get the decision repealed, if not go to his/her superior. Or the Capt can wait it out until there is a new Base CC and see if they will allow him access. FYI. I’m a 24 year veteran with an honorable discharge, but was given the decision of being boarded which would have led to a OTH discharge or just walk without a retirement and take the honorable. I took the honorable. Tried to appeal to the AFBCMR for my retirement, but they denied it.

  15. Daphne Thomas

    This greatly saddens me. You are being PUNISHED for ONE event. That lack of judgement does not make you a bad person…and it does NOT make you more likely to do it again. People need to wake up and realize this registry does more harm than good. I’m so sorry…

  16. Marty

    Your daughter forgave you…and maybe you forgave yourself, but you are living the present, while the “sex crime racket” lives in your past. Thanks to the SO REGISTRY, lots of salaries are being subsidized. For lawyers, judges, sex offenders agencies, and “house check” goons, etc. It is repugnant that our justice system, is two tiered, one for the rich, one for regular folk. But most educated people are aware of that.

    My view is to not let them affect me and maintain normalcy as much as possible
    I refuse to be depressed, sad, or mad, being on the registry. It is hard, but it can be done.
    But sustaining normalcy requires mental toughness. Keep your SELF strong….and focus on “fighting for your mental well being, and lifestyle normalcy”. You should win AND you and your family can win. It’s “your life”…which is just a job and just a game to the LACKEYS, which there are many.

    I know it’s easier said than done, but DO NOT allow the “system”, and the “game players/robot servants” to win, they are happy to destroy your life ..many are “Karens” and religious hypocrites, “stone throwers”. DON’T LET THEM CHANGE YOU OR AFFECT YOUR LIFE…but If they do…stabilize your life and do it quickly…then wave at the morons and float away thinking, “nope, you can’t sink my boat..; punk”.

    1. Capt Charles 'Bob' Munsey Jr. USN Ret

      My faith in God has helped me through this man-made mess. I have my family, my friends, my Christian brothers and sisters, so I am getting by just fine. I am inspired to fight when I see injustice and that is just what I am doing and will continue to do until justice is once again part of our nation’s principles. We are not a perfect nation, but we are a better nation than the one some politicians are trying to make it.

  17. mbgodofwar

    Is there a chance that a letter to the base commander could get you reinstated to the benefits/access?

  18. vinny

    what a disgrace this government is!

  19. Olivia Richards

    Captain Bob Munsey
    Bob,

    I am enraged and in total shock! The unexpected ferocity of the withdrawal of your military rights and privileges at the Patrick SFB, after enjoying them for the last 21 years, is insane.
    I am convinced a few politicians engineered this vile strategy to weaken your unflinching resolve to fight laws based on sensationalized myths and lies about persons on the registry. Sadly, the commander of the base believed them! Now, we need to include it on our list to educate commanders of military bases to stop this “cancer” before it spreads to other bases in Florida and beyond.

    Thank you for your 29 years of faithful service to our great nation. For us who have met and know you personally, we thank you for your spirit of hope and encouragement wherever you are. Keep on fighting the good fight. We shall be praying for you and for a resounding victory.

    God bless you.

    Mother O

  20. Sandy K

    So sad to read this; shows why change is definitely needed and more public awareness of the damage that can be done to an individual for one error in judgment and for which the person not only “paid his debt” but also had no further incidences. These registries have got to go.

    1. Oswaldo

      Sandy,
      I only wished the public cared. I’ve personally seen people fall for the misinformation and distortion of facts. In Oklahoma, citizens fall for these political tactics that politicians use to gain votes.
      I wholeheartedly agree. The registry must go!

  21. DisabledVet

    I read your story and I feel for you! 10 year Navy vet here and while I normally use the VA hospital in Richmond, thankfully they are building the new one up north closer to me – at least I won’t have to worry about Doctors.

    Also, it’s possible that this base access denial is for more than RSOs, ultimately. DoD I’ve heard is now using IMESA and DBIDS for base access, and those hit NCIC looking for any felonies. They can easily flag whatever they want, I imagine.

    Good luck with everything!

  22. Christian Seitz

    Capt. Munsey,
    As a OS1 Navy EOD that served with honor and distinction, I first and foremost want to say thank you for your service. Not to the Navy, but to the cause we in the Navy and every branch felt we served for. The freedoms we earned as Americans. The freedoms challenged by the registry.
    I connect with so many experiences you have had. I left the active service in ‘91. I too lost my wife and committed my offense soon after. While considered a misdemeanor, it has none the less cost me my occupation as a geriatric Physical Therapist. And like you, my community seems to have moved past my mistake, but the government can’t seem to do the same.
    I consider myself lucky, since I haven’t had the issues with the V.A. here in California that others in different states have had.
    In closing, I have a gut feeling ( something that EODs seem to develop better than most and what likely kept me alive), that I would have enjoyed and been honored serving under your command.

  23. The Criminalized Man

    Captain Munsey,

    I salute you. Your ongoing service to the cause of freedom will not be forgotten.

  24. Kim Avery

    Captain Munsey, I am deeply saddened and sorry to read of your injust situation. I can certainly relate as a woman who’s been on the Virginia registry for the past 12 years, ridiculously labeled for life as a violent offender. I know a good bit about the injustice of our system and I agree with you that we both would have been better off if we’d committed murder. Ironically, I would never harm another human. It’s upsetting that there are so many decent people whose lives have been irrevocably destroyed by the unreasonable fear and those who capitalize on it. I’m sorry that your 29 years of service have not been honored but I do thank you for your dediction to serving our country and I pray that you will find some justice. Keep fighting the good fight.

  25. Tim in WI

    Captain Munsey,
    On the case of Packing ham & the implications upon free speech. I point your attention to a MI attorney actively on the DDI, in the form of a YouTube contributor @Lehtoslaw.
    Steve Lehto is specialized in lemon law but in his podcasts discussions cover many aspects concerning the color of law. Today’s posting ( Sunday) has to do with speech. The fact that he specializes in lemon law for me wreaks of the man in charge of my actions here and now.
    That being me describing SOR as a lemon to bitter to swallow per upset to my guts. The title of Mr. Lehtos relevant piece is: Judges Agree that Journalism Could be Outlawed in TX. Does that sound like a free speech to you Captain? Clearly Packingham identified the attempt to ban speech by the people. That fact all by itself declared a certain dispositions and attitudes of those people’s persistence. Stevens post coincides coincidently with the letter I sent to my local small town newspaper, the BDN.
    A letter in which I decry the enemy and lent example to the editor, A Mr. Wolfe, relating how local news papers & the “sex offender” are in the same boat – more or less. How internet news has demolished the circulation and general well being of Journalism in America. I wrote about dropping attention spans I wrote about the availability of porn, lawful and not. I talked children, I talked about Mr. Brooks – a compliant offender. Mr Brooks is the guy who ran over folks in an Christmas parade here in WI last year, who infamous actions were exacerbated by the DDI during his pro se trial.. I made that same point to the editor-. Was his being a registrant, play a role in his crimes? I make no direct correlation at this point, but I wonder if it did. Sometimes the line between fame and infamy is thin indeed.