“Wannabe Vigilante” who killed registrant sentenced to 40-70 years

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By Todd Cooper . . .

James Fairbanks found out Wednesday what wannabe vigilantism costs you.

Twenty to 35 years in prison, real time.

In May 2020, Fairbanks decided that Mattieo Condoluci didn’t deserve to live because Condoluci had been convicted twice of child molestation — in 1994 in Florida and in 2007 in Sarpy County.

Prosecutors suggested that the killing was premeditated, that Fairbanks had sought to hunt down sex offenders, even mapping out a path to another child molester.

He ended up at Condoluci’s rental home in northeast Omaha, where he riddled the 64-year-old man with seven shots, many to his torso, one to his temple.

His version: He went to warn Condoluci to stay away from children when Condoluci rushed him at the front door.

Prosecutors’ version: He assassinated Condoluci in a twisted attempt to be classified as a hero.

Douglas County District Judge Russell Bowie listened to both sides before imposing a prison sentence of 40 to 70 years. Under state law, which cuts most sentences in half, Fairbanks must serve 20 years in prison before he is eligible for parole; absent parole, he’ll serve 35 years.

Does he regret killing Condoluci?

“I do,” he said.

Asked if it was because he had abandoned his own children or because he killed a man, Fairbanks said, “I’ll have to think about it.”

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9 Thoughts to ““Wannabe Vigilante” who killed registrant sentenced to 40-70 years”

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  1. q

    Death first, justice 2nd. Always.

    Question: When they talk about “prevention” does that include these “preventable” scenarios or would that contradict the narrative?

  2. H n H

    Just remember, the entire registry scheme is here “if it protects the innocence of just one child”. Somehow I don’t see the benefit if such a scheme is clearly responsible for multiple deaths. I didn’t think the powers to be were allowed to do any harm at all. Guess I’m wrong on that. How/why the registry in any forms is allowed to continue is beyond any reasonable logic. No wonder our country is going down. The registry makes one aspect of life impossible… love.

  3. mut

    the lawmakers who sensationalized his crimes, put a target on his back and published his address should also be held accountable.

    1. A Mistake They Made

      They are all accomplices!

  4. Perry P

    Too late though. A man is dead, BEFORE The Fact. This is why Politicians must act to change The Registry so there won’t b any more Vigilantes killing Us! HE still gets to live while the other guy remains dead. How fair is that?
    Nuff Said!

  5. Kohli

    This is why I believe sex offenders above all others deserve to arm themselves with a firearm as no other person is being mapped out for harm and or death then these people are. Let sex offenders protect themselves and their families by being able to own a firearm.

  6. Kohli

    I say once you are off parole and probation and your fines and dues are paid you should be allowed to get your firearm right back. Especially if the crime was non violent with a weapon

    1. H n H

      They seal that up by making parole or probation lifetime. You have to think like them, that is.. How something could be given (earned) back, taken away. They couldn’t easily explain someone not on parole, but make anything with “sex” attached to it automatic lifetime parole, and that’s that! Problem solved, more votes for them whilst projecting the facade of protecting precious little boys and girls and their little innocence.. … Boy, this registry sounds more and more like a cash cow scheme for some 3rd world dictatorship.

    2. Tim in WI

      Research up the SC minority opinion about felons and firearms ban. The thing about the right to bear arms is it is a god given\ or natural right. In other words, a fact of right that is inalienable from man. Sure a gov can make such fantasy a law, and even convict men of violations of the prohibition, but it will not stop men from bearing arms AND using them.