You are here

Arkansas joins Halloween hysteria myths

Dealing with Halloween issues in January seems a bit bizarre, but when legislatures insist on pushing through bills based on sex offender/Halloween hysteria, it must be dealt with.

That is what Arkansas is doing, and NARSOL and our Arkansas affiliate organization Time After Time want to know why. Sold as necessary to protect children, this bill prohibits a portion of Arkansas’ registered citizens from handing out candy on Halloween and from wearing masks and/or costumes as part of any Halloween event where children other than the registrants’ children are present.

We ask that question in our press release that was sent to our media sources on the 28th, the day before the bill is considered in the House Judiciary Committee.  Read the press release here.

Help us reach more people by Sharing or Liking this post.
EMAIL
Facebook
Google+
https://narsol.org/2019/01/arkansas-joins-halloween-hysteria-myths/
PINTEREST
LINKEDIN
YOUTUBE
RSS

Avatar

This topic contains 14 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by Avatar Donna 1 month, 3 weeks ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #51431 Reply
    Avatar
    admin

    Dealing with Halloween issues in January seems a bit bizarre, but when legislatures insist on pushing through bills based on sex offender/Halloween hy
    [See the full post at: Arkansas joins Halloween hysteria myths]

  • #51432 Reply
    Avatar
    R M

    “Why would a senator introduce a bill based on myth, a bill without a
    shred of evidence in support of it, a bill that is not needed and will do nothing to protect
    children from sexual harm?” Well, because they want to be re-elected.

    • #51443 Reply
      Avatar
      a man without a country

      I’m afraid I have only one copy of the excellent book “Manufacturing Victims: What the Psychology Industry is Doing to People” by Dr. Tana Dineen. I wish I could afford a copy for everyone one of these numbskulls, including Cotton. Oh, and maybe send them a copy of Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible.”

      Probably too many big words in the titles of those for these people to read, no matter what state they’re from!

  • #51434 Reply
    Avatar
    Don Gury

    I’ve an idea. It may sound crazy, but how about if everyone when born gets put on “The” registry, and as they grow older, EARN the right to be removed? You’ll be tracked by Social Security number, and if you do something wrong you get placed back on. Just like the revolving doors in our prison system! 1984, you say? Or Big Brother? Look around and you’ll find we’re already there!

  • #51448 Reply
    Avatar
    Martin Freedberg

    I live in Illinois & the Halloween Hysteria has been going on here for many yrs,so no surprise that other states are now putting them in….SOR’S cant give out candy & the costume thing,but also you must either leave your home during the trick/treat hours or cant have any lights on in your home.The city I live in tells parents to NOT go to any home that is not lit up(even though they may NOT be SORS).….got caught once a few yrs ago,but local police let it go,cause I had never given them a hard time on anything.They later apologized to me on “tricking” me into opening the door.Things the states go thru to ruin peoples lives is beyond me!

    • #51482 Reply
      Avatar
      Minor American

      How theHelll do you deal with friends family or even emergencies at Your door ! It’s NaAZI GERMANY ALRIGHT !

    • #51469 Reply
      Avatar
      Tim IN Wisconsin

      Are you upstate near border? I’m very near S. Beloit.

  • #51446 Reply
    Avatar
    Jim

    Just wait until all this non fact based hysteria and crimes against our rights comes to an end, which it will. Then Welcome! the Billions of dollars of law suites that we will win at the cost of the people who have been and are BULLING us for all of these years. Arkansas folk cant even spell the states name right or they cant pronounce it to the spelling “Or most cant read Arkansas to say it correctly”. Also doing this in January, they are hoping the people there that can read might miss it because obviously the other people know Halloween is in October. Just thinking.

  • #51442 Reply
    Avatar
    John S

    One of our members, playing devil’s advocate, said that somewhere there are, there must be media stories about registrants who have committed assaults on or around Halloween. This is something that I’d like to ask all of NARSOL and our allies to research and hopefully refute, in 2 parts. The first is for all members when possible to search for any and all media stories, at least in their home areas, to see if there are any verified, confirmed stories that a person already on any US or state s*x offender registry (or any similar system) s*xually molested anyone, child or adult, on Halloween, going back to, say, 1969. The second is to do the same thing but to focus on the years before 1969, beginning at least when there was any effort to set up any system to track convicted offenders.

    All this information may already be, and probably is, collated; if so, a listing of these sources should be shared (again). But a “just in case” effort could be helpful, too.

  • #51441 Reply
    Avatar
    John S

    I was present at the hearing when this bill was first discussed.

    Senator Garner at one point in his testimony referred to an article he found online, citing “110 sex offenders arrested in Halloween sweep”. His use of the headline alone was a key factor in getting this bill a “do pass” through the state Senate Judiciary Committee. We ATAT members learned the article itself listed the rough numbers of the charges the arrested registrants. Sadly, more than few were caught with child porn, others on technical violations. But the article (and I have checked several “variations” put out by local newspapers and TV stations in that area–California, I believe) did NOT indicate in any way that even 1 of the 110 were engaging in any Halloween activities! Again, on the basis of the scare-headline alone, the bill went through the committee; however, it was not a unanimous vote.

    Even in Arkansas, fact-based research and persistence can begin to make some progress.

  • #51458 Reply
    Avatar
    Svejk

    So when do we start the revolution and burn the place down? Discussing it with these imbeciles in power obviously isn’t helping. Can the fool who introduced the bill be sued in his official capacity? We don’t need to prove anything! The burden of proof is on these guys to show that those 110 sex offenders arrested in Halloween actually had something to do with a Halloween-type offense. I’m actually surprised that nothing was said to the zombies assembled about that. Go figure.

    Sick of it all,
    Svejk

  • #51459 Reply
    Avatar
    Christina

    This law has been in affect for many years in Louisiana. Even worse is that there is a law that prohibits registered citizens to go within 1000 feet of a school, park, day care and here’s the kicker “Or any Place where minors assemble “ now I ask you were is there such a place that minors don’t got ? Bars stripe clubs? This seems to be the only place in Louisiana that one can go

    • #51464 Reply
      Avatar
      Christina

      Sorry for the spelling my autocorrect is in high gear and it makes me to upset to proofread 🤣🤣

  • #51463 Reply
    Avatar
    Kurt

    When legislators act like hysterical idiots, they’re begging for another branch of government, like the judiciary, to step in and block them.
    Fundamentally, judicial activism is a bad thing. Judges have their role, and legislators have theirs. But when one branch of government “goes full retard” as that movie line goes, they’re inviting judicial activism.

    The only moral and legal prohibition on Halloween activities that could be denied to a registered sex offender would be that such registrants can’t invite kids over to their house with an implied promise of getting candy. That could mean either no lights and no decorations, or it could mean that if the sex offender wants to decorate his home to celebrate the holiday, he (or she) has to turn off the porch light and put up a sign saying “NO TRICK OR TREATING– SORRY”.

    The First Amendment protects the rights of all persons in the USA to recognize, celebrate, and decorate for any holiday they wish. If you can put up an Islamic State black flag, if you can hold a public devil worship prayer service, surely you have the right to observe Halloween. At least if you’re a free citizen no longer on parole or probation.

    If you’re still on government supervision in the form of parole or probation, sure, they can significantly restrict what you do and who you associate with. They can order you not to go to a party where children will be present, they can tell you not to wear any costume that conceals your identity, etc.

  • #52918 Reply
    Avatar
    Donna

    A little late in reading this article, but hoping comments keep coming on this “extremely stupid” bunch of people who believe what they do is justified. I like the comment from Jim on law suits after this bs is finally stopped and we can all sock it to them. Hope will keep us going strong.

Reply To: Arkansas joins Halloween hysteria myths
We welcome a lively discussion with all view points provided that they stay on topic - keeping in mind...

  • *You must check the "I am not a robot" box and follow the recaptcha instructions.
  • *Your submission must be approved by a NARSOL moderator.
  • *Moderating decisions may be subjective.
  • *Excessively long replies will be rejected, without explanation.
  • *Be polite and courteous. This is a public forum.
  • *Do not post in ALL CAPS.
  • *Stay on topic.
  • *Do not post links or email addresses..
  • *Please enter a name that does not contain links to other websites.
Your information:





<a href="" title="" rel="" target=""> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <pre> <em> <strong> <del datetime=""> <ul> <ol start=""> <li> <img src="" border="" alt="" height="" width="">

Cancel