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No increase in sex crimes on Halloween says NARSOL board member

By Lenore Skenazy . . . A Boston Herald article is calling for a new Massachusetts law to stop registered sex offenders from participating in Halloween. Such a law would violate the rights of sex offenders, for no public benefit whatsoever.

The piece—as random as a piece can be, in that it is not tied to any actual news, crime, or person of note—quotes an attorney named Wendy Murphy, who states, “Halloween is like Christmas for sex offenders.” That’s a catchy phrase, but she never explains exactly what she means. Do sex offenders get gifts on Halloween? Gifts of children?

“They know they’ll have lots of access to kids and that they can’t get in trouble even though they’re required to stay away from children,” Murphy says.

That is simply not true. Murphy is repeating an urban myth that sex offenders snatch trick or treaters. No evidence of such a phenomenon exists.

“There is not a single recorded case of a child being abducted or harmed by someone on the sex offender registry during trick-or-treat or other Halloween activities,” says Sandy Rozek, communications director of NARSOL, an organization that advocates for saner sex offender laws. “And valid, reliable research shows no increase in sex crimes at all on Halloween.”

The temptation on Halloween isn’t to kidnap candy seekers, it’s to use the image of innocent, endangered children to create new fears and restrictions. Consider my post from Monday about the counties in Virginia that have made it a crime for kids over the age of 12 to trick or treat at all.

We have a really hard time distinguishing between actual Halloween dangers—being hit by a car—and non-existent but creepily thrilling ones, like being stalked by demonic child rapists when the moon is full and the wolves are howling.

Read the full article here at reason.com

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  admin 2 months ago.

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  • #47448 Reply

    admin

    By Lenore Skenazy . . . A Boston Herald article is calling for a new Massachusetts law to stop registered sex offenders from participating in Hallowee
    [See the full post at: No increase in sex crimes on Halloween says NARSOL board member]

  • #47450 Reply

    Michael A Pierce

    “Murphy is repeating an urban myth that sex offenders snatch trick or treaters. No evidence of such a phenomenon exists.”

    (Absolutes) can be a dangerous path to travel especially when defending the rights of R.S.O’s.
    It’s not that I disagree with your assertion, it’s that I believe the word “phenomenon” could be used to describe a single incident.
    Fear mongering hath no limits.
    Ex communi periculo, fraternitas
    P.S. I’m on your side. 😎

  • #47451 Reply

    Frank Tatum

    We have more going on with our country that need more attention than worrying about sex offenders snatching up kids on Halloween its not even heard of makeing these ridiculous laws making it harder for people to live their lives after a mistake do something about the kids that are taken from their families in concentration camps lord knows what’s going on there

  • #47474 Reply

    David M. Ortmann

    I am with you, and I quote a social worker colleague of mine who works with sex offenders:
    “The safest place in your neighborhood are the houses closest to that of a sex offender. These people are so excessively overly monitored that they can hardly go to the bathroom without it being posted to the Internet.”

    • #47516 Reply

      allie

      absolutely right. I would rather live next door to a sex offender than a drug dealer that might temp my children into doing drugs. or someone who was accused of attempted murder.

  • #47475 Reply

    Donna

    Wendy Murphy has made a career out of lies and fear. She has made unsubstantiated statements from day one, just look her up.

  • #47518 Reply

    Mom

    As a society in today’s day and age people are still superstitious and there is never a 13th floor. So it’s not surprising that the same folks avoid having a 13th floor because of superstition. They love to fall for the old pins in the candy and sex offenders snatching kids on Halloween. It’s nothing but urban legend. We are not becoming more civilized with time. We are backpedaling.

    • #47559 Reply

      WC_TN

      People have become so mentally lazy that they rely on “media experts” to tell them what to think on just about any given topic. Lost is the idea of independent critical thought and weighing the evidence for one’s self. Law & Order: SVU is treated as a documentary and not a fictitious overly dramatized TV series solely designed as a political weapon to keep the sex offender hysteria stirred to a frenzied level.

      It’s more comfortable to look outward for the threats to their children’s sexual innocence than it is to look inward at one’s on circle of family and friends. It’s easier to focus on “the other” than “one’s own”.

      It just bolsters a fact we all know. We may be released back into the community, but the laws are written expressly to ensure we are never a part of the community. We are excluded from as much of society as can possibly be legally defended. The message is, “You are among us, but we will NEVER AGAIN allow you to be one of us.”

  • #47598 Reply

    George Simmonds

    Yeah, it is ridiculous! They just want to breed fear to justify passing more restrictive laws and increasing their budgets for police and the sex offender registry, if you think about it they are using the same tactics Hitler used, that is bashing Jews to justify his agenda. Common sense would tell you that any sex offender would be stupid to do anything to a child that trick or treats at his house because the father maybe waiting outside and/or there would be any witnesses, like friends, no child trick or treats alone. But is easier to go by your fear than to use your common sense!

  • #48352 Reply

    B

    I saw an article where it mentions there is some sort of candy law in Texas that bans people on the registry from handing out candy or even having their lights on.

    False. No such law exists. The only restrictions in Texas on this topic are placed on people on probation or parole. Once you’re off paper, there is no Candy Law.

    Unreliable news sources strike again.

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