How many kids are on the sex offender registry?

By Michael M. . . . The headlines today are full of stories of righteous indignation over immigrant children being separated from their families. While that dilemma is certainly newsworthy, the American public seems largely unaware of the fact that tens of thousands of our own children are being taken from their families each year and tossed into a rapacious legal system that chews them up and spits them out as sex offenders   As hard as it may be to believe, The Department of Justice estimates that there are at least 89,000 children on the sex offender registry, and it should come as no surprise to anyone that it’s destroying their lives.

Imagine, for a moment, what it would be like to have your child listed publicly on the sex offender registry, complete with a photograph, home address, and even a description of the sex crime that resulted in his (or her) inclusion on the list.   Consider what kind of life your child would have if, because of sex offender restrictions, he couldn’t attend school, go to a park or swimming pool, or have a birthday party because other children will be there. Some states simultaneously have laws requiring minors to attend school while at the same time forbidding sex offenders from being anywhere near a school. 44% of sex offenders overall (and presumably juvenile sex offenders, as well) are unable to live with their supportive families due to residency restrictions. Many are forced into foster care, even as bills have been introduced to bar juvenile sex offenders from foster homes and other communal youth facilities.

Elizabeth Letourneau, PhD and professor at the Bloomberg School’s Department of Mental Health and director of the Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse said, “Not only is this policy [of putting juveniles on the sex offender registry] stigmatizing and distressing, but it may make children vulnerable to unscrupulous or predatory adults who use the information to target registered children for sexual assault.” Letourneau’s findings in a 2018 study published in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law found that registered children are five times more likely to be approached by an adult for sex than non-registered child sex offenders and four times more likely to have suicidal thoughts.

Other wide-ranging unintended consequences of being a juvenile on the registry include harassment and violence. 52% of juvenile registrants have reported violence or threats of violence which they directly attributed to their inclusion on the registry.   Bruce W., whose two sons (aged 10 and 12) were placed on the registry for an offense against their 10-year old sister, reported that a man once held a shotgun to his 10-year old son’s head. In a 2012 Human Rights Watch interview, one female juvenile registrant said, “I was on the public registry at age 11 for the offense of unlawful sexual contact… Random men called my house wanting to ‘hook up’ with me.” Other HRW interviewees described beatings, drive-by shootings, and even beloved family pets being killed.

Without a doubt, some of the children on the sex offender registry are convicted of horrific crimes which led to appropriately harsh punishments. There are others, however, who end up convicted and branded as sex offenders for what has been characterized as fairly normative behavior for children or teens, such as playing doctor or engaging in sexual exploration. Teens who exchange sexy selfies shouldn’t be charged with creating child pornography. Having consensual sex at that age may be a very stupid thing to do, but it hardly rises to the level of sexual assault or predation.

At least 27 states and one territory require that juveniles must register if they commit a sex offense for which an adult in the same jurisdiction would be required to register.   37 states reserve registration for juveniles convicted of specific qualifying offenses. It is difficult to know exactly how many children have been placed on sex offender registries nationwide, however. Studies regarding children on the sex offender registry are relatively rare, and the states typically do not track information regarding the ages of offenders when they were added to the registry. Human Rights Watch attempted to obtain this information from each of the 50 states, but only two responded – and those with aggregate counts only. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, juvenile sex offenders comprise 25.8% of all sex offenders and 35.6% of sex offenders against juvenile victims. They estimate that in 2004 there were 89,000 juvenile sex offenders known to police.

As for the overall age distribution of these juvenile offenders, there is very little data available. Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Minnesota, Texas allow juvenile registration at 8-years old.   Massachusetts allows sex offender registration for kids as young as 7-years of age. In 2011, there were 639 children on Delaware’s sex offender registry, 55 of whom were under the age of 12.   In 2009, a study conducted by the Department of Justice discovered that nationwide, one in eight child sex offenders who committed crimes against other children was under the age of 12. Overall, according to the DOJ’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, “Known juvenile offenders who commit sex offenses against minors span a variety of ages. Five percent are younger than 9 years, and 16 percent are younger than 12 years. The rate rises sharply around age 12 and plateaus after age 14.”

Maya R. was arrested in Michigan at the age of 10 for play-acting sexual scenarios while fully clothed with her step-brothers, aged 5 and 8. She pled guilty to criminal sexual conduct and was required to register as a sex offender for 25 years. It is not unheard of for both children engaged together in sexual conduct to each be charged with a crime and simultaneously listed as the victim in the other’s case.

According to a 2013 Human Rights Watch report, the idiosyncrasies of the juvenile justice system can seriously compound the problems associated with how child offenders end up on the registry.   It is doubtful, for example, that they fully understand their rights to due process and against self-incrimination.   And we really don’t know if they fully comprehend the devastating (and sometimes forever) consequences of pleading guilty before they accept a plea bargain. Even adults can find the plea bargaining process confusing or coercive, even though this is how 94% of all criminal cases are resolved. Often, these juveniles are not informed that they will be subject to registration until after they have pled guilty, and sometimes not until they have finished serving out their juvenile detention or incarceration. The decisions made by a 10-year old should never have permanent ramifications that will impact them for the rest of their lives, yet, in many of these cases, they do.

The inclusion of juvenile sex offenders down to the age of 14 on the registry is mandated by SORNA (Sex Offender Registry and Notification Act) and has been a major bone of contention and non-compliance by the states since it was signed into law in 2006. In 2016, additional guidelines were issued to give states more flexibility in implementing laws regarding juveniles on the registry, but many states remain out of compliance and some of the states who are in compliance are being challenged in the courts. It is worth noting that the DOJ estimate of 89,000 juvenile sex offenders was in 2004, two years before SORNA began pushing the states to put juveniles on the registry. That number is probably much higher now.

The 2018 study in Psychology, Public Policy, and Law supports the legal challenges, finding that “…in combination with the available literature indicating that these policies do not improve public safety, the results of this study offer empirical support for the concerns expressed by those calling for the abolition of juvenile registration and notification policies.”

The abomination of having nearly a hundred thousand children on the sex offender registry is just one of the many reasons why these laws are unconstitutionally cruel and unusual and need to be repealed now.

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Michael McKay

Michael McKay is NARSOL's Director of Marketing and a frequent contributor of articles to the NARSOL website. He is the published author of several non-fiction books, contributing editor & board member at LifeTimes Magazine, the executive editor of The Registry Report, and founding host of Registry Report Radio on BlogTalkRadio.

This topic contains 29 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by Avatar Tim l 1 year ago.

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  • #41941 Reply
    Michael McKay
    Michael McKay

    By Michael M. . . . The headlines today are full of stories of righteous indignation over immigrant children being separated from their families. Whil
    [See the full post at: How many kids are on the sex offender registry?]

  • #41942 Reply
    Avatar
    TS

    Children are at least 10% of the registry’s makeup using the data here. 10%!

    You destroy how many children to save one? Are they trying to save the registered child by embarrassment? This is insane!

  • #41950 Reply
    Avatar
    TDAL

    Dear Citizen,

    Are you people SURE you want your government and “law” to determine “normal” human sexual interaction between or amoung your children?

    • #41971 Reply
      Avatar
      Maestro

      If the government wants to be the parents then everyone with children should just drop the kids off at their state legislature instead of daycare on their way to work 🤷🏻‍♂️
      What happened to the days when parents dealt with child behaviors?

      • #42139 Reply
        Avatar
        WC_TN

        Let’s say for argument’s sake that the little boy in the photo for this article is a registered sex offender on some state’s adult registry for life. Let’s see what statements such a move by the state makes:

        (1) If a 9-year-old boy or girl is put on the adult registry for life like a true child predator, that says the state assigns this child the adult capacity of understanding sexual encounters.

        (2) It makes the legislature, the DA, the judge, and when applicable the jury guilty of the vilest of hypocrisy.
        Touching or even asking to touch a 9-year-old sexually RIGHTFULLY incurs the most serious category of sex crime conviction. The SOUND reasoning is that the adult or older minor (16 and older) is taking advantage of the innocence of that child in a cold, calculating way. When the child is the victim, he or she is totally naive about all things sexual and therefore cannot give informed consent. However, when that very same young, innocent, naive child commits a “sex crime” they are suddenly looked upon as being fully capable of understanding their actions to the same extent of an emotionally mature adult. The recognition of a child’s immaturity and innocence should not be subject to change based on social or political agendas.

        Kids who commit “sex crimes” (using the term in its loosest possible sense) should be handled as the innocent, naive immature beings they are. This should be handled by parents; not the state.

        Now, let’s address how the registry makes these little ones targets for real child predators:

        I’m going to be very pointed and forth-right here. Those of us who have a sexual attraction to little prepubescent boys or girls or teens/older teens who are not yet legal age very likely have a common thread in our deviant fantasies. That common thread is that we portray the child in our minds as very precocious and receptive to sexual advances. We want to think of them as going along willingly and eagerly. We don’t want to literally be a child rapist. We want a willing and knowing participant; not a victim. THIS IS THE DISTORTED THINKING AND RATIONALIZATION.

        When the state labels a young child or teenager as a sexual predator they are saying this child was out for sex at any cost. The state is saying these young kids / teens know what they’re doing in every respect. That feeds right into our distorted rationalization that even relatively young kids know what they’re doing sexually. How can they call kids innocent and naive on the one hand and on the other be so quick to label them as sexual predators with the ADULT CAPABILITIES of forming and acting on criminal intent of the most serious kind?

        To close, kids are innocent and naive about things sexual. The law has it right on that score. Children shouldn’t be looked upon with sexual lust. The law has it dead wrong when treating child “sex offenders” (again using the term as loosely as possible) the same as true adult child sexual predators. It is unconscionable to treat children and young teens in that manner.

  • #41967 Reply
    Avatar
    Maestro

    “The Department of Justice estimates that there are at least 89,000 children on the sex offender registry, and it should come as no surprise to anyone that it’s destroying their lives.”

    This needs to be better publicized.

    “Bruce W., whose two sons (aged 10 and 12) were placed on the registry for an offense against their 10-year old sister, reported that a man once held a shotgun to this 10-year old son’s head…”

    Now THAT is disgusting!!!

    I think either a documentary or a docu-drama should be made about this.
    And it should be shown in a time slot right after Law & Order.

  • #41997 Reply
    Avatar
    obvious answers

    said it before and I will say it again.Our founding fathers repeated it over and over…It was the spine of the need for the second amendment.
    Any government that no longer represents the citizens of the country they claim to be representin is not a fit government and is in dire need of replacement.. Using the second amendment if needed (which is why it was given) ..

    It would be safe to suggest any government that is as abusing to its own children as the American government is simply fits the bill ..
    It would be safe to suggest any government that sets any of its citizens up for assault and as a target for abuse to other governments and or agencies, and vigilantes also fits the bill..
    It would also be safe to suggest any government that was completely too incompetent to even comprehend the constitution and to follow the constitution of the land it was sworn to uphold and protect again fits the bill..

    The list goes on.. I read somewhere everyone is happy NARSOL is celebrating a ten year birthday anniversary..How many more birthdays would you like to be celebrating as victims of the American government?

    I am not offering answers. I am just curious… It is the silliest thing on earth to expect the courts will stop the next 1000000000000 birthdays of the registry.. and it is even more silly to expect the registry to just stop “because the government” suddenly gets a crisis of conscience and decides to follow the law..the Clintons will be in prison before that happens.. (and they won’t be paying for their crimes any faster then dinero will)

  • #42004 Reply
    Avatar
    nathan

    “This needs to be better publicized.”

    This is a great article !! Let post this on facebook, twitter, reddit and go for it!!

  • #42011 Reply
    Avatar
    d

    When a mother calls the police because her child was playing doctor. I read this case yesterday WTF the government needs to be stopped and stopped now this is ridiculous.

    D.H.,
    Appellant-Defendant,
    v.
    State of Indiana,
    Appellee-Plaintif

    • #42285 Reply
      Avatar
      A significant other

      A mother who calls the police on her child for doing what was considered normal for thousands of years surely has her own issues with sex. Hormones in puberty are telling an adolescent teenager that their time to biologically reproduce is approaching. It is scientifically normal. What is not normal is these people who have twisted ideas. Perhaps they need their own type of counseling. Explaining to a child about sex and the appropriate time to have sex and why people have sex is the NORMAL thing to do. NOT call the police. Our society is out of control. The witch hunt is out of control. Today a man is afraid to even talk to a woman for fear of what the repercussions might be. Women will be pushed backwards and we will be segregated from men once again because trust no longer exists. It is all because an army of civil lawyers, led by good OLD Gloria, is determined to fill their bank accounts with money on the blood and lives of others. Merchant of Venice anyone? These civil attorneys need to be locked up.

  • #42023 Reply
    Michael McKay
    Michael McKay

    As the author of this piece, I just want to say up front that I appreciate all of the comments and feedback!

    Let me explain WHY I wrote this article and why I think it’s important. The people who care about registry reform generally fall into two broad categories: (1) Those on the registry (and their friends, families & advocates) who are silenced, marginalized, disenfranchised, bullied, and frightened into staying under the radar, and (2) the relatively tiny number of people who are not personally affected by these unfair laws and are unafraid of being attacked for being a “pedophile lover” or “soft on rapists.” This HAS to change.

    The general public is not only woefully misinformed on most registry issues, they LIKE it that way. Quite frankly, they don’t really WANT to be informed of sex offender registry constitutional overreach, abuses, and hysteria. Life is a lot simpler and superficially gratifying when you don’t have face the cognitive dissonance of having to reconcile mercy vs. justice, revenge vs. forgiveness, punishment vs. rehabilitation, efficacy vs. passion, etc. etc. This is a very real challenge we face – people want simple answers, simple solutions, cheat-codes, and five-minute “life-hacks.” They really don’t want to have to think about this problem. They just want to know which You Tube video or Twitter-storm is going to fix it.

    I suppose I wrote this piece because I am a provocateur. I wanted to expose people to truths that will make them uncomfortable, angry, indignant. I wanted people who never gave a crap before to maybe start. I wanted to make a point that doesn’t instantly generate hate and vitriol in response. My point isn’t that the registry is only wrong as it pertains to juveniles, my point is the registry is wrong – and maybe you’ll be able to see that through the prism of how it treats juveniles.

    The trick now is to get these facts out in front of the greatest number of people possible. Link to it, tweet it, facebook it, talk about it. Please don’t keep your outrage to yourself. Getting the average person on the street to admit that these policies are unfair and counter-productive for juvenile SOs is a productive step toward helping them to realize that they’re also unfair to everyone else subjected to them.

    But first they have to read the article. That’s where YOU come in.

    Michael M.

    • #42037 Reply
      Avatar
      Maestro

      Great response! Both the article and the response should go viral.

    • #42046 Reply
      Avatar
      R M

      “… people want simple answers…”; Tell them how much they spend on registering and supervising all registrants and that 95+% percent don’t ever commit another sex crime, and maybe they will agree. After all, money is the root of all evil.

      • #45157 Reply
        Avatar
        Tim l

        R M
        Your hypothesis presumes rational persons are the audience. It also presumes its about financial discipline. I can find no sign of either in America. 21 trillion …….

  • #42033 Reply
    Avatar
    Saddles

    Hello Michael while I enjoy some of your writings to strive to make others aware of this sometimes we all should be born with the label attached to our birth certificate SEX OFFENDER, what do you think. After aren’t we all born in sin. Now are they not playing master of one’s fate?

    Sure we can all screw up, as they say kids will be kids. A bit of punishment or correction is good but I wonder who is the “wild bunch” of society as a hole. The middle aged man that screws up or the one that gives the authority to say did we tell you once not to screw up and you don’t get a second chance with me.

    That is being a bit over authority with some of this. Sure sex isn’t good until marriage but when someone run’s amuck because of not sparing the rod. Oh I forget we cannot spare the rod as that’s law not to whip your children and if caught its the parents that get in trouble also.

    So were does this sex dilemma end. Change or understanding that we are all born sinners? Now civil Rights are good but Civil Rights can go a bit too far wouldn’t you think in a situation of a child caught up on the sex registry for even being curious.

    • #42038 Reply
      Avatar
      Maestro

      “ After all aren’t we all born in sin.”

      Saddles, enough already!
      I do hope to meet you one day. I’ve got tons of evidence to show you.

      In the meantime, please STOP with the religious correlation. It has no place in this matter (or any matter).

      Also, it’s *whole* not “hole” when referring to a grouping.

  • #42040 Reply
    Avatar
    Svejk

    This is a horrible state of affairs!

    I fear that publishing this on social media may not have the results we wish. I feel it would be better off to send it to newspapers, news outlets and the like. The AP might run a story. Fox would certainly pick it up, and possibly CNN. There are just too many trolls on social media.

    I have seen very good results from full- and half-page advertisements in leading papers. Perhaps this is something also to consider spending money for?

    Svejk

  • #42067 Reply
    Avatar
    Saddles

    I’m out of here folks thanks to others andI’m glad I didn’t say pray as that might offender or Jesus is love.

  • #42074 Reply
    Avatar
    kerry

    Fantastic article, agreed this is the type of information that will sway the public. I suggest highlighting cases of children, minorities, etc. on the registry. This will garner support and further the cause.

  • #42079 Reply
    Sandy Rozek
    Sandy Rozek
    Admin

    Sad to say, it will take more than one article or one topic to turn around the thinking of the American people. I am all for inundating everything possible with articles and topics that will touch their hearts, but that has been happening for ten years or more now. Human Rights Watch and Nicole Pitman have put out huge reports about the danger of criminalizing and registering children. Dr. Jill Levenson and many others have done research and reported on the topic. In 2012, Corrections.com published a piece I wrote under a pseudonym on the topic titled “If it saves one child.” Josh Groban, who was registered at 12 for touching his sister, has become an outspoken advocate, and much has been written about his situation.
    The ridiculousness of teenagers being criminalized and registered for sexting and having sex is another topic that virtually no one agrees with. Some highly publicized cases, such as Josh Anderson’s, have actually resulted in a change in sentencing after publicity. A couple in Texas, Frank and Nikki Rodriquez were in high school together. He was put on the registry for life and will remain there in spite of the fact that they’ve been married for over 20 years and have a family. They were featured in several mainstream articles and were even on a national television talk show a few years back.
    And they are still registering children for play and teenagers for having sex. We won’t give up or stop our efforts, but there are still a lot of battles ahead of us.

    • #42081 Reply
      Fred
      Fred
      Admin

      I think that one of the problems is that these are often huge reports that require an above 6th grade reading comprehension if one wants to understand the information. Far too many Americans don’t read, and I suspect that many who attempt to read these reports can’t process or hang on to the information anyway. Many of these people get their information from cable news, where emotion evoking images are displayed along with the spoken rhetoric. That is why I think we should find a way to also paint the picture for them. I am currently pondering ways to do that for this very topic. Maybe this a project we could work on together?

      • #42082 Reply
        Michael McKay
        Michael McKay

        Absolutely, Fred! I am currently working on what I’m calling a “Factoid Database” on all things relevent to the registry, because like you, I’ve found the source materials to be incredibly difficult to navigate and draw pertinent data from. (You’d think these researchers and govt agencies get paid by the word, or something!) Sometimes, even when I’m just going back to a source I’ve referenced before to find the same fact I used previously, I have trouble zeroing in on it a second time (hence my need for the factoid database, which not only tells me where I got the info, but where in the source document I can find it next time.)

        I do have some experience as a graphics designer (stemming from my publishing and web designer days) and so I will be putting together some snazzy “info-graphics” like the kinds you see on CNN or in magazines. I’ll be sure to share them with you as I go, and if you have any ideas for stats you’d like to see graphically illustrated, let me know. For now, I’m working on info-graphics on:
        > the odds of your child being targeted by an SO vs. the odds of your child becoming an SO
        > the age/race demographics of child SOs

        Oh, btw – here’s a factoid that I saw in the 2016 NCMEC Annual Report that deserves some exposure… 86% (!!!!) of the kids who have been sex-trafficked in the US became victims of sex trafficking after they went missing (ran away) FROM SOCIAL SERVICES OR FOSTER CARE CUSTODY. 86%. Kids aren’t being kidnapped from supermarkets and playgrounds to be sold into prostitution. They’re being thrust into it by the very institutions that are supposedly trying to help them.

    • #42084 Reply
      Avatar
      Maestro

      Sandy,

      One of the issues I feel needs to keep being driven home for the public and the lawmakers is that these so called “offenses” are NOT what the idea of Megan’s Law was about.
      That law was not about consensual sex be it illegal due to age difference or being in a public place (restroom, back seat of car, etc). It was not about sexting or even, dare I say – voyeurism, public urination or mooning someone.
      Megan’s Law was created for (though it hasn’t done much good) people convicted of actual child molestation/rape.
      So how does the legislature/court find that one of the two people who have been together since high school is a “threat to the safety of the public”? He MARRIED her. She’s not a victim and he’s not a threat. This is NATURAL HUMAN attraction/emotions. It needs to be said that you cannot make laws that oppress things that are natural. But as it just dawned on me, this is the same country that made it illegal way back to be involved in an interracial relationship. The government decided THEY were going to have a say in who people could fall in love with.
      I’m so disgusted that I’ve come to a loss for anything futher.

      But please make sure to always somehow throw in that Megan’s Law was NOT about these types of situations.

      • #42113 Reply
        Sandy Rozek
        Sandy Rozek
        Admin

        Yes, you are absolutely right. That must be stressed over and over.

  • #42120 Reply
    Avatar
    Saddles

    See there maestro I knew you had it in you, your making good understand as a lot of us are. I myself and I’m sure others don’t like this when they put young kids on the registry. This Megan’s law and the Adam wash thing is a bit of different in all respective measures. Sure I’m sorry about these kids ordeals just as much as everybody that has comented on here but as you said what does this have to do with some sex offenders or sex registry issues. While I could take a guess being a proper and perfect citizen but that wouldn’t even hold a candle. I believe we all have gotten burned once or twice in life but this kids stuff is a bit insensitive.

    Comon understanding is basic as long as one doesn’t kill oneselve, even over thinking can kill and I beleve its called overkill. Say you were a hunter, lived up in the mountains. One would have to kill game for food. Now killiing isn’t any good. Todays they have laws for that. So many fish or wild game one catches things like that,.I even think one has to have a permit to hunt , so now they after kids today.
    Now the kids are on the registry for life or how they chose to do it. Sure its nice to talk about all this as feedback is good for NARSOL usage and a good point is well received. If you want to look at this, and I do marketing myself. Is this a new form of human marketing if one might want to call it that. Remember the lawmakers makes laws and they use a lot of excuses for public safety. Just like not using a cell phone in a car (which is common sense) while one is driving but human law can go a bit too far. I guess flashing out of a school bus would get you in a bit of deep x%?*

    People should care but some just like to intermeddle and do the best they can to overthrow today. Sure we all have opions or comments about this and that but when law takes over and starts putting kids on the registry that is a human progress story in action and yes I agree it should be in major newspapers all over America. When they start putting 11 and 12 yr. olda and some a bit younger on the registry than something is wrong in Denmark.

  • #42141 Reply
    Avatar
    WC_TN

    There is growing outrage over the manner in which illegal aliens are having their children taken from them at the border with no guarantee they’ll ever be reunited again. Where is the outrage for children who supposedly commit “sex crimes” by doing what children NATURALLY DO AS A PART OF GROWING UP being torn from their families with little to no hope of reunification with their families?

  • #42205 Reply
    Avatar
    Saddles

    From the sex registry to illegal aliens crossing the border and American’s harboring these kidsor sepration from parents. Talk about confusion. I guess it wouldn’t be any cruler than that or people causing pain to another. WC makes a good point, and all this for crossing the border. And I thought America was home of the free and the brave. I guess there is no land of the free anymore.

    Even the human mind can be distorted by those police and high authorities giving opportunities. I’m sure any parent would be sick to be seprated from their child or better yet on the sex registry for life. Call it thought behavior or parenting or if a man thinkest. Should we say who is waving the gavel.

  • #42443 Reply
    Avatar
    Henry

    We are all Label Victims.

  • #43280 Reply
    Avatar
    Sloan44

    “The Department of Justice estimates that there are at least 89,000 children on the sex offender registry”
    But that doesn’t included the PAST amount of children placed on the sex offender registry, that are now adults.

    Its difficult, if not impossible, to know the full amount of such. But since the registry has been made available to the public 22 years ago when Bill Clinton signed Megan’s law, and all the minors placed on it since, It is “MY OPINION ONLY” that the registry holds somewhere in the amount of 200,000 people that are: (1) Children (89,000 Currently on it) and: (2) Adult registrants..that were minors when they were placed on the registry. This should be stressed repeatedly.

    According to President Clinton, Megan’s law was a move he called “Circling the wagons around our children.” We all know that its destroying our children in many ways. The Most recent amount posted of those on the registry is 900,202

    I thank NARSOL for their dedication, fundamental mission and goals.

    W.A.R
    Fighting the Destruction of Families
    http://www.womenagainstregistry.org/Florida
    Follow Us on Twitter: @WARofflorida

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