NARSOL gears up to challenge Int’l Megan’s Law

By NARSOL . . . Congress’s enactment of legislation permitting the State Department to mark the passports of registered citizens and notify nations about their pending travel is reprehensible. It is beneath the dignity of the United States to brand its own citizens with a mark of derision and shame, a mark that will very likely close a great many…

Read More

Tenth Circuit COA upholds Oklahoma driver’s license requirement

By Robin . . . Unpersuaded by the court-appointed counsel’s encouragement to read a prison inmate’s pro se lawsuit liberally enough to include a First Amendment complaint, the Tenth Circuit has affirmed a lower Court’s judgment dismissing a challenge to Oklahoma’s requirement that citizens convicted of an “aggravated sex offense” must have their driver’s licenses (and state-issued identification cards) stamped…

Read More

Is prison abuse just part of a sex offender’s sentence?

By Shelly Stow . . . Closing our eyes to prisoner abuse must stop. Prisons are not supposed to be fun or pleasant. They are designed for restrictions and punishment intended to bring about rehabilitation. They are not intended to facilitate, even encourage, vigilante activities against those whom other prisoners choose to mistreat. Men in prison for convictions involving sexual…

Read More

Podcasts strengthen legal and registry knowledge

By Andy S. . . .  We are in the era of the podcast! It is a very exciting time. It’s like a DVR for audio (and video) programs. The days of waiting until the exact day and time for the program to begin are no longer. This is a gold mine of educational opportunities. While you’re riding the bus…

Read More

Conditions of Supervision

http://www.registrymatters.co/podcast-download/109/conditions-of-supervision.mp3 History of probation Probation first developed in the United States when John Augustus, a Boston cobbler, persuaded a judge in the Boston Police Court in 1841 to give him custody of a convicted offender, a “drunkard,” for a brief period and then helped the man to appear rehabilitated by the time of sentencing From the point of view of the PO, do they imagine…

Read More

Transferring to Another State

http://www.registrymatters.co/podcast-download/69/transferring-to-another-state.mp3 Larry sheds light on the complexities of how one transfers their supervision to another state. Interstate Compacts History of transferring to another state ICPP Why? Interstate compacts, such as ICAOS, are born out of necessity. For ICAOS, the necessity is for the 50 states, and 3 territories (District of Columbia, U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico) to follow identical guidelines…

Read More

Polygraph Rationale

http://www.registrymatters.co/podcast-download/67/polygraph-rationale.mp3 Andy and Larry take a deep dive, along with a couple big detours, on polygraphs. How do they work, especially as it relates to registrants, and the Polygraphs – Von Behren decision Describe how a polygraph procedure works for a registrant The recording instrument and questioning techniques are only used during a part of the polygraph examination. A typical…

Read More

Is the Registry Unconstitutional?

http://www.registrymatters.co/podcast-download/55/is-the-registry-unconstitutional.mp3 Why isn’t a sex offender registration unconstitutional? History of the registry – how/why did it come about: Pre 1994: Few states required convicted sex offenders to register addresses with local law enforcement. The 1994 Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Act, required states to implement a sex-offender registration program. 1996: Wetterling amended by Megan’s Law. Required…

Read More