Megan’s Law waste of time, money, report shows

By CBS News

This study and this article were done in 2009 but are as true, timely, and essential today as then.

A study examining sex offenses in the state where Megan’s Law was created says it hasn’t deterred repeat offenses.

The report released Thursday finds that registering sex offenders in New Jersey does make it easier to find offenders once they are accused of a sex crime.

However, by comparing arrest rates before and after the sex offender registration law was passed, the study found no significant difference between statistics before and after Megan’s Law was passed.

The study also compared sex offenders rates with violent crimes and drug offense rates in comparable time periods, and did not find any discrepancy with sex offense rates post-Megan’s law.

“Because sex offense rates began to decline well before the passage of Megan’s Law, the legislation itself cannot be the cause of the drop in general,” said the report, “Megan’s Law: Assessing the Practical and Monetary Efficacy,” prepared for the Department of Corrections’ Research and Evaluation Unit. “It may, in fact, be the case that continuing reductions in sex offending in New Jersey, as well as across the nation, are a reflection of greater societal changes.”

According to the authors, measures of recidivism rates, community tenure (the amount of time before a re-arrest), and harm reduction (decreased sexual offending), revealed no significant differences between cohorts.

“Despite wide community support for these laws, there is little evidence to date, including this study, to support a claim that Megan’s Law is effective in reducing either new first-time sex offenses or sexual re-offenses,” the report states.

The report also said that, because it saw no discernible difference made by implementing Megan’s Law, the cost of administrating the law (approximately $3.9 million in 2007) should be reexamined.

Editor’s note: and how much more is the cost today? and how many millions have been wasted since then — and will continue to be?

Read the full article here.

See the study here.

 

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    • #16989 Reply
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      David O’reilly

      The information from this study is no surprise to me and should not be to anyone else. But here’s the thing, if though this study comes back the way it does, that is it does not support Megan’s Law, state law makers are not going to do anything about it. Sex offense issues are still the GOLD STANDARD for politicians’ either for election to public office or re-election to public office. And that is because of the general public’s continuing thirst for the blood of those convicted of sex crimes—period! They, state law makers, don’t care if these laws work or even make sense, all they know is that the public wants them and to not give more and more of these laws to them is political suicide. Now, if I may, I would like to make note of a particular point bought out by this study and how it relates to the “lie” about the so called high recidivism of people who have commit(ed) sex crimes, it states:
      “…Sentences received prior to Megan’s Law were nearly TWICE as long as those received AFTER Megan’s Law was passed, but time served was approximately the same; in addition, significantly fewer sexual offenders have been paroled after the implementation of Megan’s Law than before (largely due to changes in sentencing)…”

      Now think about a minute and ask yourself, ok, if this is the case, i.e., longer sentences, fewer paroles, well then just who are these people who out here like mad crazed dogs committing more sex crimes? And this is in NJ. I can tell you first hand that here in TX that one crime conviction and your ass is out of there let alone two or more. My point is this, to be a recidivist is to commit the same crime over and over—correct? And sure, there are guys who are mentally ill and do commit another sex crime and in TX your ass is not only going back to prison for at 20+ years and if and when you do get out you are going straight into a civil commitment facility never to be seen again—GUARANTEED!

      And pretty much every state in the US has what CA calls “Three Strikes (convictions) and Your In for the Rest of Your Life” laws in place. TX damn sure has these laws but they are called “Enhancement Paragraphs” on your criminal indictment; therefore, for there to be a high recidivism rate for sex crimes, this would have to be state enabled. In other words, upon an arrest for a second sex crime, the state prosecution would have to allow for a small prison sentence and then the parole board would allow a fast revolving door—get it?

      How else could there be a “Frightening and High” recidivism rate for sex crimes??? I don’t know if my hypothesis makes sense here and if not, will somebody please straighten me out on this? Tell me just how there is a high recidivism rate for sex crimes? I do listen to sound logic and reasoning and do heed wise counsel.

      So please, somebody, anybody do explain it to me.

    • #17048 Reply
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      G. Web

      Well, the way they do this in Fl. as to the recidivism rate is, you were convicted of a sex offense, you do your time and or probation, you get registered as an SO, and no matter if you die or move from the state of Fl. you are still on the Fl. SO list. Now this part…… if you get re-arrested for ANY other crime, burglary, theft, buying or selling drugs, etc., it is considered by the state of Fl. to be recidivism BY A SEX OFFENDER. it doesn’t even have to be another sex offense, thus adding that to the statistics of recidivism. So all in all it is not a sexual re-offense, but they lump it all together as if it were. I went through many polygraphs and did not pass most of them due to a heart condition, Then was asked to take a voice stress analysis, I passed all of those and was asked to take another polygraph after the VSA, I passed the VSA and failed the polygraph. The Examiner said according to the VSA I was 100% truthful, but the polygraph said I was deceptive. He even told me before the VSA that it was much more reliable than the polygraph. So why is the polygraph test used at all? Two words…. JUNK SCIENCE. I also talked with many psychiatrists and psychologists, due to court order and prison order and all concurred I had some problems but not of a sexual disorder, and don’t pose a threat to anyone. But Florida still classified me as a tier 3 offender. WHY? Because it makes them money. MONEY and POWER is all these politicians care about, not ruining someone’s life just to get another vote by telling the general public lies about ” SEX OFFENDER RECIDIVISM, FRIGHTNING AND HIGH”. I think if they spoke the truth, they are scared the public might not like them very much and they would lose the POWER.

      • #17448 Reply
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        Profiling right there

        Wonderful the way the skew the data to their favor isn’t it? That is the basis of profiling right there.

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