Urban myth unsupported by evidence: Ice Cream Men are safe

By Lenore Skenazy . . . Paul DiMarco has been selling ice cream in Poughkeepsie, New York, for two decades. He owns a fleet of trucks. When one mom confided to him, “You gotta be careful because there’s a lot of pedophiles in this world,” he recalls replying, “That attitude falls into the same category as ‘All black people that drive…

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Reckless threat of registration brings death to son, family

By Sandy….   “They scared him to death.” When Maureen Walgren of Naperville, Illinois, said this, referring to the conversation that school officials and law enforcement had with her 16-year-old honor student son Corey, she meant it literally. Corey was at lunch on a normal school day in his high school this past January when he was called into the…

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Mr. Weiner, THIS is what life as a registered sex offender is like

By Josh Gravens and Jennifer Long…. Mr. Weiner, … While you could teach me about being a politician, I can teach you about being a conscious citizen. You know all about being a policy maker; I can tell you the part that you don’t know: what it is like to be on the receiving end of bad policy, policy only looking…

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Registered Americans fear assault, robbery, even murder

By Matt Clarke . . . As repeatedly reported in Prison Legal News, for over a decade registered sex offenders have been targeted by vigilantes and assaulted, robbed and murdered due to their past crimes. And as noted in this issue’s cover story, that is part of the dark side of sex offender registries, which allow public access to offenders’…

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Five million dollars for voodoo science? Colorado?

By Christopher N. Osher . . . Colorado has spent more than $5 million to administer polygraphs on convicted sex offenders over the last seven years despite concerns that the tests are so unreliable they can’t be used as evidence during civil or criminal trials. Polygraphs help officials decide which prisoners convicted of sex offenses are suited for release from…

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NARSOL condemns Sessions’ plan for longer prison sentences

Washington, D.C.— The National Association for Rational Sexual Offense Laws (NARSOL) strongly denounces the Department of Justice’s directive to reverse the Smart on Crime initiative introduced by the previous administration. NARSOL condemns United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ order to federal prosecutors directing that they seek maximum sentences. The length of sentence imposed at the end of a prosecution is the direct…

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Is S.C. Supreme Court right? NO! says NARSOL’s E.D. Brenda Jones

By Gregory Yee…. Last week’s S.C. Supreme Court ruling that juveniles convicted of certain sex crimes must be registered for life on the state’s sex offender registry is drawing outcry from attorneys and researchers. The opinion, issued Wednesday, upheld a family court ruling on an April 2013 incident in Spartanburg County in which a 14-year-old sexually assaulted a 5-year-old. The…

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NARSOL joins Tenth Circuit case challenging license requirement

NARSOL has filed an amicus brief in an important case challenging Oklahoma’s “unique identifier” requirement on state-issued driver’s licenses. Ray Neal Carney is a current resident of the Oklahoma prison system. His conviction was for a sexual crime, and after examining the conditions of registration upon his release, he filed a lawsuit protesting a number of the restrictions he will…

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Brain-based fact or interrogator’s fiction?

By Michael Rosenberg . . . I want to first say that I am tired of watching the registered citizens in my sex offender class pay for the privilege of being interrogated. Tired even more of having to watch as their truthfulness and willingness to honestly participate are questioned. Those guys are my favorites, and one day, the truth about…

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Registries help feed nation’s thirst for mass incarceration

By Rick Anderson . . . The September 1988 rape and murder of 29-year-old Diane Ballasiotes in Seattle, Washington, followed by the 1989 rape and sexual mutilation of a 7-year-old Tacoma boy, were the seedlings of today’s nationwide sex offender registry laws – a 50-state network that tracks over 805,000 registrants and whose usefulness as a crime-prevention tool has been…

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