International Travel-Rules of the Road

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Janice Bellucci & Paul Rigney….
International travel for registered citizens and members of their families has changed significantly since the passage of the International Megan’s Law. This presentation at our 2016 Atlanta conference educated registered citizens and family members about current rules and regulations affecting their international travel.

RSOL Conf 2016 International Travel-Rules of the Road

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15 Thoughts to “International Travel-Rules of the Road”

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  1. Josh

    International travel is something I used to enjoy and do as often as possible. My wife is Filipina and it’s been a complete nightmare dealing with trying to be together again. We have not seen each other in 4 years now and between the regulations trying to get a visa for her to come here and me being blacklisted in the Philippines we don’t know if we will ever see each other again.
    We are looking at other countries to possibly meet again even for a short time. I’ve explored political asylum in other countries and exploring every avenue possible. I would give up my US citizenship without a second thought.
    Does anyone have information on countries that will allow us to visit as well as ones to avoid ?
    After I was denied entry in the Philippines i haven’t even tried to travel anywhere else as I can’t afford to waste money just to be sent right back.

    1. Emil S

      I read somewhere that European countries are not that strict, except UK, in terms of traveling. That might have changed though. About immigration, idk.
      Of course learning a new language will be something as most European countries speak non english languages.

      1. Fred

        I hear Iceland is a nice place to live with tolerant people. The brutal winters might be worth it.

      2. Fred

        They speak English there.

      3. Josh

        I have heard good things about Iceland, I’m not much for cold weather but, as you said, it might be worth it. I’m planning to go to Portugal in February and hoping that it works out.

      4. charles

        The Scandinavian countries are fine as long as you have a good skill/degree so you can get a job. I left a few years ago and now hold a technical job in Denmark and I’ve gotten no flak at all. All my work permit paperwork breezed through. Just make sure you really are employable (i.e. highly skilled) before heading over, you might get deported if you show up and can’t contribute to the economy.

  2. David

    What happens when one is denied entry into a foreign country? Does the person is forcefully deported back to the US or does he have to buy new air ticket? Thanks

    1. Quinn

      They detain you and put you on next flight home

      1. David

        Do you get any option about going to any other country other than the US?

      2. Josh

        No, you are sent back to your point of origin.

    2. Josh

      That person is sent back on the next available flight and will if that person has a round trip ticket they will be forced to pay depending on the airline.

  3. Maestro

    In regards to countries with lower ages of consent laws such as Canada (I believe the age of consent there is 15), if you’re a registered US citizen with an offense with a minor who would be considered legal age in Canada (and the offense was consensual albeit illegal in the US) why would Canada deny entry?

  4. Maestro

    In regards to countries with lower ages of consent laws such as Canada (I believe the age of consent there is 15), if you’re a registered US citizen with an offense with a minor who would be considered legal age in Canada (and the offense was consensual albeit illegal in the US) why would Canada deny entry?

  5. T

    What sense does it make for a registrant who is free to travel anywhere around the world who is required to do the 21 day notification prior to travel which is required by IML?, only to learn that when he does it, an alert notice will be sent by the feds to that country he’s heading to and will be setup for denial of entry.

  6. T

    Would it possibly be a good idea to recommend changes to be made in the IML? like when the feds are sending out alert notices to countries about registrants, instead of informing them about registrants having criminal records and claiming recidivism, they should recommend registrants go through special screening and verification, go through some establish agreement to follow the laws of that country, and let them go about their business along with the “enjoy your visit, stay out of trouble”.
    .